Archive for August, 2013

Redwood forest photo and haiku inspire others

August 29, 2013

The recent blog post Redwood Forest Haiku, two versions, inspired by a photo my sister took in a Redwood Forest Park inspired other haiku.

Here’s one from GD

In Redwood forest
Giants standing grand and still
Holding the Silence.

Norman Zierold suggested changing the last line to my second version to Guarding the Silence.

In Redwood Forests
There are Giants among us
Guarding the Silence

Paul Stokstad sent two versions, the last one, i reminded him, required an extra syllable, which he added. It turned into a beautiful third haiku.

~1~

In redwood forests
there are giants among us
tall, holding silence

~2~

In redwood forests
there be giants, in silent
cathedral light

adding a missing syllable turned into

~3~

In redwood forests
there be giants, in silent,
soft, cathedral light

If you are so motivated, leave your version in the Comment section.

Redwood Forest Haiku, two versions, inspired by a photo my sister took in a Redwood Forest Park

August 24, 2013

I signed up with Instagram so I could see the pictures my sister took on her vacation to Mendocino in Northern California. They drove north to Humboldt County to see the California Redwood Coast Park Forest. Among the beautiful photos she posted, this one of the Giant Redwoods, considered the largest trees in the world, inspired me to write this haiku. Here is that photo, and two haiku versions, for your enjoyment.

Redwood Forest

Redwood Forest Haiku

~1~

In Redwood Forests
There are Giants among us
Who Hold The Silence

~2~

In Redwood Forests
There are Giants among us
Holding The Silence

© Ken Chawkin
Fairfield, Iowa
written 8/23/2013
posted 8/24/2013

See Being in Nature, a gift from a tree, with links to other tree poems. See Redwood forest photo and haiku inspire others.

Bill Graeser memorializes Ansel Adams in his award-winning poem “Magic Light”

August 20, 2013

Magic Light

By Bill Graeser

Ansel Adams sits up
reaches for his camera—
his arm bony as a tripod leg
for it is “Magic Light”
the golden light of sunrise
and sunset.

But then he lays back down
and focusing instead
through the lens of his soul
in the black box of his skull
he sees… all the light

that ever filled Yosemite
or blazed the crosses at Hernandez
and with his brittle jaw
with its few teeth remaining
there in the dark room of a coffin
he smiles.

“Magic Light” by Bill Graeser won the Iowa Poetry Association’s 2012 Norman Thomas Memorial Award. Bill posted it August 28, 2012.

Congratulations, Bill, you deserve this memorial award for a memorial poem of the great Ansel Adams. I’m sure he’d approve, and be pleased! Visit http://www.anseladams.com for more amazing photos.

Another great poem by Bill Graeser is What You May Not Know About Frankenstein. I posted it as At last—the truth about Frankenstein. Visit his website for more fine poetry and photographs: http://billgraeser.wordpress.com.

Found this detailed interview with Marc Silber and Michael Adams: An Inside Look at Ansel Adams’ Photography In Yosemite, posted April 10, 2013. I also found this earlier fascinating video posted by Silber Studios on May 7, 2011 on How Ansel Adams Photographed His Iconic “Moonrise Hernandez”. Marc is given a tour of the house and darkroom by Ansel’s son, Michael Adams. He was seven years old and with his father when he took the iconic picture of the moonrise over Hernandez and described how he created it. The music was composed by Andrew Buffett, the American musician, composer, author and philanthropist. Peter is an Emmy Award winner, New York Times best-selling author and co-chair of the NoVo Foundation. He is the youngest son of billionaire investor Warren Buffett. Here is an earlier video posted by Marc Silber about advice on how to visualize your photos, from a rare interview with Ansel Adams: Photography Visualization Advice by Ansel Adams. Photo visualization was so important to Ansel Adams that he made it the first chapter of his book on photography.

On Old Congress Run Road, a hauntingly beautiful poem by Susan F. Glassmeyer

August 20, 2013

ON OLD CONGRESS RUN ROAD

Susan F. Glassmeyer

A lost Lab running inside her own black shadow,
sideswiped by a car going north on the pike,
then struck by a driver heading south.

I’m an accidental witness on this no-moon night,
busy with my own troubles, like anyone else.
I don’t want to hear the dog’s pinched howl
or her fitful whimpering after she drops
like fallen cargo in the middle of the road.

I want to turn away, but a pressing thought
pulls me over—Don’t be afraid of the suffering.
So I give up, sit down in the street, stopping traffic.
Wrap myself around the furry clock of the dog’s life
as if to stop the stream pouring out of her head.

Not dead, but dying, I tell the onlookers.
I say, Touch her. I say, Don’t be afraid.
A few hands join mine as we follow the rise
and fall of the animal body, the warm belly growing
cooler with each exhalation. Pain appears to be lifting.

Now, under the village lamplight, a stunning
pink foam, almost iridescent, spilling
from dog lungs to dog mouth. Spilling a still life
of wet roses on the dark pavement: blood petals
on our hands, wrists, boots and ankles.

In a slow (call it reverential) movement, Bailey
(her collar says Bailey) arches her spine in an asana
of surrender. Musically sighs. Now dies.

from Rattle #37, Summer 2012

This reminds me of William Stafford’s poem, Traveling through the Dark, but Susan F. Glassmeyer’s poem takes the reader into the fearless heart of compassion. Profoundly beautiful!

Also see I Tell You, a poem by Susan F. Glassmeyer, from The Incomplete Litany of Untold Stories

Read more of her poems in Sixfold Journal’s Poetry Winter 2015.

I Tell You, a poem by Susan F. Glassmeyer, from The Incomplete Litany of Untold Stories

August 20, 2013

I Tell You

I could not predict the fullness
of the day. How it was enough
to stand alone without help
in the green yard at dawn.

How two geese would spin out
of the ochre sun opening my spine,
curling my head up to the sky
in an arc I took for granted.

And the lilac bush by the red
brick wall flooding the air
with its purple weight of beauty?
How it made my body swoon,

brought my arms to reach for it
without even thinking.

*
In class today a Dutch woman split
in two by a stroke – one branch
of her body a petrified silence,
walked leaning on her husband

to the treatment table while we
the unimpaired looked on with envy.
How he dignified her wobble,
beheld her deformation, untied her

shoe, removed the brace that stakes
her weaknesses. How he cradled
her down in his arms to the table
smoothing her hair as if they were

alone in their bed. I tell you –
his smile would have made you weep.

*
At twilight I visit my garden
where the peonies are about to burst.

Some days there will be more
flowers than the vase can hold.

~ Susan Glassmeyer ~

(The Incomplete Litany of Untold Stories)

Also see On Old Congress Run Road, a hauntingly beautiful poem by Susan F. Glassmeyer.

Read more of her poems in Sixfold Journal’s Poetry Winter 2015.

Susan Glassmeyer is the co-director of the Holistic Health Center of Cincinnati and has a private practice as a somatic therapist, specializing in the Feldenkrais Method®. She recently won a grant through Xavier University (Cincinnati) to complete work on a chapbook titled “Body Matters.”  She promotes local writing classes, workshops, and activities through her website http://www.LittlePocketPoetry.Org.

Diane Vance reports on M.U.M.’s new David Lynch MA in Film for The Fairfield Ledger

August 14, 2013

M.U.M. adds master’s in film

By DIANE VANCE | Aug 14, 2013

The Maharishi University of Management debuts a new master’s degree this semester, The David Lynch MA in film.

The university has offered undergraduate filmmaking since 2007 in its Media and Communications Department and animation courses available in the Art Department for many years. It is now adding the next layer of learning.

“The graduate program is designed to take an idea to completion in a major project, with the possibility of publication,” said Gurdy Leete, co-chairman and associate professor of M.U.M.’s Media and Communications.

The course and fall semester begin Monday, and as with all M.U.M. courses, are taught in the block schedule of one course at a time.

“We’re expecting 20 to 25 students,” said Leete. “This program is about creating a supportive environment where artists connect with the audience. Students will have the opportunity to make deep connections in the film-making industry and gain recognition.”

The one-year, August to May course, includes curriculum in Advanced Narrative, Advanced Screenwriting, Acting for Film, The Frame, The Field, and from February to April an Advanced Video Media Project and then, The Media Market. Students who have not yet learned Transcendental Meditation will be taught the technique during the first few weeks of class.

About half the expected students have attended M.U.M. before.

“I’m excited about the group of students enrolled and how they will be producing great work,” said Stuart Tanner, co-chairman and assistant professor of M.U.M.’s Media and Communications. “The students will get a great deal out of working with one another and following the structure of the program. The goal is to produce a major piece of work.”

Tanner has had a glimpse of some of that work. The department offered a full scholarship for the master’s in film program based on applicants submitting a short film to compete for the scholarship.

Leete said the department received several dozens film submissions, which were all screened by the department faculty and program sponsors. The top six short films were then submitted to David Lynch, filmmaker, writer, artist, for viewing.

Tanner talked with Lynch by phone Tuesday for about 20 minutes.

“He really liked viewing the six shorts,” said Tanner. “Some of them were very accomplished pieces. He said when watching a film he watches for what stays with the viewer, what leaves a strong feeling. A short film doesn’t have a long time to develop that. He selected the film by Kinga Kulcsar as the scholarship winner because hers had that quality of making an impression, leaving the viewer with a feeling.

“I got to tell her last night that she won the scholarship.”

Tanner said the film will have a link at M.U.M.’s David Lynch MA in Film website filmschool.mum.edu in the near future.

Students in the master’s program also will visit with Lynch about filmmaking.

“We’re still working with David about his schedule,” said Leete. “Students will connect with him by Skype and at some point in the year the class will travel to Los Angeles for a couple of days and students will have a few question and answer sessions directly with him.”

Tanner said naming the program for David Lynch is a perfect fit for the program.

“He is the filmmaker’s film maker,” said Tanner. “He’s a fantastic person to be around. He is a role model and visionary with great integrity to his own vision. Putting his name on the program is perfect. It’s an idea that’s been bubbling away for a while and now it’s happening.”

Tanner said Lynch will be calling the classes throughout the year.

“And we will bring other insiders from the industry, we’ll bring other experts to the classes,” said Tanner.

Leete said the department is in contact with other industry people to connect with the program.

“Other luminaries in the field will connect by Skype, visit Fairfield and lead workshops or be available when we are in L.A.,” said Leete. “Schedules are always changing for people in film, but we expect quite an array of industry insiders from various fields to work with us.”

Not all students in the program will need to produce a major film. Many aspects of film will be studied and students may collaborate with one another to create a project. Students may screen write, direct, cast, design costumes and sets, or be special effects supervisor. Film also has an important business side and students may focus on setting up a media company.

“Students can create different products, it could be a film or a website of music videos,” said Leete. “The idea is to make a giant step forward and make it easier at the end of the program to work in the industry.”

“All we require is that film plays a significant part in the final project. The program is about having a year to go deeply into a creative experience that will transform both you and your career,” according to information on the program’s website.

Admission requirements include a bachelor’s degree in any subject, a resume, a portfolio of best work, including at least one film of any length created by the applicant, other creative work and special achievements. Applicants also have an interview with department faculty.

Published with permission from The Fairfield Ledger

Also reported in Indiewire: There’s a David Lynch MA in Film. Why is it in Iowa? Must students meditate? Burning questions, we’ve got answers: Besides Transcendental Meditation, What Does One Learn with the David Lynch MA in Film?

Fairfield Ledger reports: Local artists present ‘Iowa Gold’ to governor, state fair

August 14, 2013

Local artists present ‘Iowa Gold’ to governor, state fair

Aug 08, 2013 – Lifestyles

Composer and singer/songwriter Jane Roman Pitt and Iowa landscape photographer Ken West, both of Fairfield, officially presented the music video “Iowa Gold” to Gov. Terry Branstad Wednesday afternoon in the State Capitol Building in Des Moines.

Earlier Wednesday, Pitt and West were interviewed by Charity Nebbe on Iowa Public Radio’s Talk of Iowa. The interview can be heard at http://iowapublicradio.org/post/iowa-gold-and-wisconsin-heroes.

A tribute to the richness of Iowa’s farm culture, people and rural landscapes, “Iowa Gold” was produced solely for noncommercial use to promote the beauty of Iowa and the state’s scenic byways.

Rep. Dave Heaton lauded “Iowa Gold” as “so beautiful, both in sight and sound, that says so much about our state.”

Barbara Sletto, director of the Heartland Youth Choir, which was scheduled to perform “Iowa Gold” 2-3 p.m. today on the Budweiser Stage at the Iowa State Fair, praised the song.

“The words are great and the melody is very singable — the song is great,” she said.

Pitt said she was inspired to write her “love song to Iowa” because the state embodies the principles on which America was founded

“The freedom to own land and the choice to live in cities or open spaces,” she said. “And Ken’s beautiful landscape photos reflect the feelings of pride for our state that I tried to convey in the song.”

West described “Iowa Gold” as a song Iowa school children or anyone can relate to with contemporary lyrics easy to sing.

“We hope our video inspires the next generation to appreciate and care for the land they are inheriting,” West said.

Pitt is a recording artist, songwriter, and composer. She is winner of the grand prize at the International Amadeus Choral Competition and her “Midnight Lullaby” CD received a “Parents’ Choice Award,” an award that honors the best material in children’s media.

West’s images have been featured on Iowa Public Television’s “Iowa Outdoors” and at the National Center for Nature Photography, which is America’s first and only center devoted exclusively to nature photography.

More information on both artists can be found on the Iowa Gold website at www.iowagoldsong.com.

Related Information: Heartland Youth Choir IPTV’s “Iowa Outdoors” Iowa Gold Iowa Public Radio

Published with permission from The Fairfield Ledger

Related news: Fairfield Artists and Musicians Share in Iowa Gold for more information and other news coverage. Laura Simon reports collaboration of composer and landscape photographer to showcase Iowa.

Laura Simon reports collaboration of composer and landscape photographer to showcase Iowa

August 11, 2013

KTVO’s Laura Simon reports how composer Jane Roman Pitt and landscape photographer Ken West collaborated to showcase Iowa’s gold in a music video. They also presented “Iowa Gold” to Governor Branstad at the State Capital Building in Des Moines and discussed the possibility of it becoming the new state song. The Heartland Youth Choir performed the song as part of their repertoire on opening day of the Iowa State Fair.

Will add a link to Laura Simon’s actual report posted on KTVO as soon as it becomes available online. See Fairfield Artists and Musicians Share in Iowa Gold for more information and other news coverage.

David Lynch speaks with Alan Colmes about his 16-country tour film Meditation Creativity Peace

August 8, 2013

banner-colmesLegendary Filmmaker David Lynch

Award-winning filmmaker David Lynch speaks with Alan Colmes about his 16-country tour, teaching millions of struggling people how to achieve peace through Transcendental Meditation. Click on the title to go to the website and listen to this dynamic and inspiring interview: [Video] Alan’s FASCINATING interview with legendary filmmaker David Lynch! and here: David Lynch On The Value Of Transcendental Meditation.

Watch the trailer for a new documentary film on David Lynch titled “Meditation Creativity Peace” | Russell Brand and David Lynch at LA Premiere of ‘Meditation, Creativity, Peace’ Documentary | Russell Brand and David Lynch at LA Premiere of ‘Meditation, Creativity, Peace’ Documentary | Enlightenment, The TM Magazine: Meditation Creativity Peace: How the David Lynch Foundation Brings Change from Within.

Visit the new website, Meditation Creativity Peace, for a list of upcoming and previous screenings: http://meditationcreativitypeace.com.

You may also enjoy this earlier article David Lynch wrote for Jane Magazine’s celeb issue: Celeb Spiritual Report: One significant day in my life by David Lynch for Jane Magazine (May 2004).

River Rock Speaks, poem from a rock

August 8, 2013

I used to go for walks with a friend in Cates Park, located in Deep Cove, a little seaside village situated on the eastern edge of the District of North Vancouver, in British Columbia, Canada. In that park along the Burrard Inlet there is a walk called the Malcolm Lowry Walk, named after author Malcolm Lowry, who squatted in the park from 1940-1954 in a shack with his wife Margerie. He wrote much of his classic novel Under the Volcano there, which was later made into a movie. This short trail takes you through a forest path, past a children’s play area, then along the waterfront to a nice pebble beach with a view of Indian Arm.

On one walk, I noticed a bunch of smooth rocks along the roadside. I thought it was odd for these water-worn rocks to be by the road instead of on the beach. I began thinking of that childhood tune of sticks and stones breaking bones, and was drawn to one of the rocks. It spoke to me. It cracked me up with it’s cosmic sense of humor; I had to write it down. After I wrote the poem, I picked up the rock and took it home.

RIVER ROCK SPEAKS

Deep Cove River Rock
From the Road
Says its Thing
I’ve been Told

Make No Bones
About This
Of All Stones
I AM ONE!

© Ken Chawkin

Read Park Poems from Ken Chawkin for more stories and poems inspired from visits to other parks in the Greater Vancouver area.


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