Archive for May, 2012

Dr Oz discusses ancient Ayurvedic approaches to weight loss with The Raj expert Candace Badgett

May 15, 2012

Dr. Oz invited Ayurveda experts to share with the audience how to lose weight and improve their health. Three guests who tried them lost 56 pounds effortlessly using these methods! Dr. Oz shared ancient secrets unlike anything you have ever tried. No diet or exercise is needed to shed the pounds! Here is a preview to the Friday, May 11, 2012 Dr. Oz Show on Ancient Ayurvedic Secrets to Lose Weight.

Dr. Oz tastes a simple food to help with weight loss: spiced mung bean soup.

One Ayurveda expert, Sunita Mohan, explained the six tastes, shared knowledge of various spices and their beneficial effects, and recipes to help you eat healthy and lose weight! Links to segments provided below.

Another Ayurveda expert invited to participate in the show was Candace Badgett, owner of The Raj, an authentic award-winning Ayurvedic health spa located in Maharishi Vedic City, Iowa.

Candace discussed traditional Ayurvedic approaches to losing weight by demonstrating certain procedures on selected audience members, including Dr. Oz. These treatments are known to improve digestion, remove toxins, nourish the tissues, and reduce stress, which disrupts normal bodily functions causing weight gain. Here are pictures of Amy, Katy, and Dr. Oz receiving Udvartana, Swedana, and Shirodhara, respectively.

Candace explains that a Vata imbalance is almost always at the root of excess weight. She recommended mixing chickpea flour with herbalized Vata oil to the consistency of peanut butter and applying it as a friction massage, which heats the tissues and removes the appearance of cellulite.

Candace and Dr. Oz discuss the recipe for Udvartana as Amy receives the treatment.

Dr. Oz looks at Katy as Candace explains the value of Swedana, usually taken after abhyanga, an oil massage. The steam allows the oil to penetrate deeply into the tissues, helping to remove the toxins that disrupt hormones, impede proper communication between cells in the body, and are usually responsible for weight gain. “The removal of toxins,” Candace emphasized, “is absolutely crucial to a successful weight-loss program!”

“The removal of toxins is absolutely crucial to a successful weight-loss program.”

Candace Badgett describes Shirodhara as a stream of herbalized warm oil rhythmically poured back and forth across the forehead. This treatment deeply relaxes the mind and body powerfully removing stress and fatigue. It also enlivens the happiness hormones.

Candace Badgett explains the pleasing effect of Shirodhara to Dr. Oz

Candace Badgett explains the pleasing effects of Shirodhara to Dr. Oz

Dr. Oz was pleasantly surprised and said it was “such a spectacular feeling having the oil rushing up your scalp…it is a very soothing experience…it is a life-changing experience. I recommend any of you who have the ability to try this out at least once. This is so cool as it goes back and forth.”

Dr. Oz describes Shirodhara as a “life-changing experience.”

Continuing to lay on the table Dr. Oz began to close out that segment of the show. He thanked Candace for all her advice. “I really appreciate it. Wonderful job.” He said, “Be right back, everybody,” then told the Ayurvedic technician to, “Keep going, it feels good.”

Watch this second video on the Ayurvedic Treatments to Slim Down segment posted on the Dr. Oz Show website. Click the link to see all the excerpts from this show: http://www.doctoroz.com/episode/ancient-ayurvedic-secrets-lose-weight.

Read more about The Raj Weight-Loss Program, and other programs, at the Maharishi Ayurveda Health Spa website: www.theraj.com.

Also see Dr. Oz on Transcendental Meditation and Dr Oz’s gift of TM to his employees resulted in personal and corporate benefits — see the video and Some Reports on Dr. Oz’s Interview with Oprah about TM and her Next Chapter.

South Asian Heart Center uses Transcendental Meditation to prevent and manage heart disease

May 12, 2012

South Asians are becoming painfully aware of the high incidence of heart attacks, often fatal, frequently among seemingly healthy, trim, and physically active close family & friends.

The South Asian Heart Center (SAHC) at El Camino Hospital in Mountain View, California has developed a four-pronged approach to prevent and successfully manage heart disease among men and women of South Asian descent living and working in America. Here is an introduction to their work presented by Executive Director Ashish Mathur, and SAHC Medical Director Cesar Molina, MD, FACC: South Asian Heart Center Helps South Asians Fight Heart Disease.

In this fourth of a four-part series on Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes Dr. Molina focuses on the importance of deep rest and its effect on heart-health and diabetes. He specifically covers the importance of meditation (or restful alertness) on longevity and health, and the science behind the effective technique of Transcendental Meditation (TM), which produces a “hypo-metabolic state of restful alertness.” Learn the evidence on the profound impact of this unique form of meditation on a whole class of chronic ailments. This is a very clear and comprehensive presentation!

South Asian Heart Center Webinar: TLC – Restful Sleep & Restful Alertness April 25, 2012, published on Apr 26, 2012 by sahcsathi.

At 26:26 of Part 4, Dr. César Molina begins talking about resting while awake with Transcendental Meditation and how it impacts our health, especially for South Asians and their propensity toward heart disease. One of the therapeutic modalities from the South Asian Heart Center is Transcendental Meditation as a stress-reduction technique. Dr. Molina reviews his talk starting at 56:18. He summarizes the lifestyle methodology to prevent heart disease and enhance longevity at the South Asian Heart Center: nutrition, physical activity, the importance of restful sleep, and the importance and benefit for stress reduction through Transcendental Meditation decreasing cardiovascular risk factors, decreasing hospital expenditures and admissions, and enhancing longevity.

Dr. César Molina presents Wednesday Lunch-hour Webinar Series TLC: Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes. Here are the 4 topics where you can download the video and a PDF of the main points and graphs for each talk. The recommendations can be applied to all Americans regardless of ethnicity or geographical location.

1. TLC: Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes Overview: May 2, noon
2. TLC: Exercise as Medicine: May 9, noon
3. TLC: The Dinner vs. the Diner: May 30, noon
4. TLC: Restful Sleep and Restful Alertness: June 20, noon

For more information: www.southasianheartcenter.org and www.tm.org.

Olivia Harrison talks about George being inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame 2004

May 11, 2012

Olivia and Dhani Harrison accept award for George after Tom Petty and Jeff Lynne induct George Harrison Rock and Roll Hall of Fame 2004.

Here is a partial transcription of Olivia’s acceptance speech. Very beautiful and wise! Olivia is an exceptional person!

Here I go again. I can talk about George, you know, forever. But uh, I won’t. There was a quote by the Indian poet Tagore that George read to me one day. He said, “Blessed is he whose fame does not outshine his truth.” And here we are in the Hall of Fame. But the inductees are not chosen because of their fame, but because they expressed their truth through their music. George said that he tried to write songs that would, uh, still mean something years from now. And I think it’s safe to say that in spite of his immense fame his truth will never be out-shined or forgotten. (applause) Good.

Olivia went on to say that had George been there that night he would have thanked a lot of people. But she did thank one person in the room that George knew the longest in his life—”someone who looked after him, and all of them, from the time they were 13, for George, the end of his life, and that’s the mysterious Neil Aspinall.” And she thanked Neil for holding it together, otherwise the phenomenon (of the Beatles) might not have happened or stayed together as long as it did.

Seven years later, with Olivia’s help, . Also see: George Harrison: The not-so-quiet Beatle, article by Philip Goldberg in LA YOGA Magazine.

See George Harrison – The Last Performance (John Fugelsang), a rare and wonderful interview on VH1, where George and Ravi Shankar came in to talk about an album he had produced called, Chants of India. George also talked about a concert he gave for the Natural Law Party, and the need to educate students on how to raise their consciousness. He answered questions about his concert for Bangladesh, the first benefit concert of its kind; and how he introduced the Beatles to Transcendental Meditation when they met Maharishi Mahesh Yogi who was going to be speaking at the Hilton Hotel. He unexpectedly played some music, including a new song, Any Road, with the line, “If you don’t know where you’re going any road will take you there,” which came out on his posthumous album, Brainwashed.

I later found this sweet video clip of George posted Nov 29, 2019 by @GeorgeHarrison, the official Twitter feed for the Estate of George Harrison, on the 18th anniversary of his passing. Olivia Harrison described that moment: “There was a profound experience that happened when he left his body. It was visible. Let’s just say, you wouldn’t need to light the room, if you were trying to film it. He just…lit the room.” George was a great soul and we remember him today with much love and affection.

Sir Paul McCartney is interviewed on Australia’s Channel Seven’s Sunday Night, February 5, 2012

May 11, 2012

0205_sunnight_paulm_lrg_17isi85-17isi88Copyright © 2012 Seven Network Australia

On Sunday Night, February 5, 2012, Channel 7 reporter Ross Coulthart conducted an exclusive interview with Ex-Beatle Sir Paul McCartney for Channel Seven’s Sunday Night. Besides talking about his latest CD, Kisses on the Bottom, Paul answered questions about his earlier days in the Beatles and visit to Australia, his music, and his wives.

Speaking of Paul’s wives, here’s something I caught by surprise on YouTube while watching Paul McCartney on Ellen recorded November 2005—Nancy Shevell in the audience! Paul was still married to Heather Mills at the time. The lady in the front row audience shots 0:22–0:25, and 5:15–5:16 definitely looks like her.

According to Wiki, McCartney started dating Shevell in November 2007, before he finalized his divorce with Heather Mills. But this show was taped 2 years earlier in Nov 2005. Wonder if they knew each other back then, if she actually met Paul back in 2005 on the Ellen show? If not, 2 years seem to have passed until they started dating. Either way, it’s kind of prophetic! They announced their engagement three and half years later on 6 May 2011, and were married after five months on 9 October 2011. This one looks like a keeper. We wish them both much happiness. I especially love the beautiful song Paul wrote for Nancy, which they danced to on their wedding night, My Valentine.

Related: Paul McCartney and Nancy show up to see James play, and surprise the small Brighton club audience and ‘My Valentine’: Johnny Depp and Natalie Portman Star in Paul McCartney-Directed Video.

Washington Post: VA testing whether meditation can help treat PTSD

May 4, 2012
 

VA testing whether meditation can help treat PTSD

By Steve Vogel, Published: May 3

Seeking new ways to treat post-traumatic stress, the Department of Veterans Affairs is studying the use of transcendental meditation to help returning veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan.

Veterans Affairs’ $5.9 billion system for mental-health care is under sharp criticism, particularly after the release of an inspector general’s report last month that found that the department has greatly overstated how quickly it treats veterans seeking mental-health care.

VA has a “huge investment” in mental-health care but is seeking alternatives to conventional psychiatric treatment, said W. Scott Gould, deputy secretary of veterans affairs.

“The reality is, not all individuals we see are treatable by the techniques we use,” Gould said at a summit Thursday in Washington on the use of TM to treat post-traumatic stress suffered by veterans and active-duty service members.

By some estimates, 10 percent of veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan show effects of post-traumatic stress disorder, numbers that are overwhelming the department

“Conventional approaches fall woefully short of the mark, so we clearly need a new approach,” said Norman Rosenthal, a clinical professor of psychiatry at Georgetown University’s medical school.

Rosenthal told the gathering that TM, a meditative practice that advocates say helps manage stress and depression, is “possibly even a game-changer” in how to treat PTSD.

VA is spending about $5 million on a dozen clinical trials and demonstration studies of three meditation techniques involving several hundred veterans from a range of conflicts, including Iraq and Afghanistan. Results from the studies will not be available for 12 to 18 more months.

But Gould said he was “encouraged” by the results of other trials presented at the summit.

Two independent pilot studies of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans showed a 50 percent reduction in symptoms of post-traumatic stress after eight weeks, according to the summit’s sponsor, the David Lynch Foundation, a charitable organization founded by the American filmmaker and television director.

Results from the initial phase of a long-term trial investigating the effects of TM on 60 cadets at Norwich University, a private military college in Vermont, have shown promise, school officials said at the summit.

Students practising TM at Norwich showed measurable improvement in the areas of resilience, constructive thinking and discipline over a control group not using the method. “The statistical effect we found in only two months was surprisingly large,” Carole Bandy, an associate professor of psychology who is directing the Norwich study, said at the summit.

“For us, it’s all about the evidence,” said Norwich President Richard W. Schneider, who added that he was a skeptic before the trial began.

Operation Warrior Wellness, an initiative of the David Lynch Foundation, is providing TM training to troops recovering from wounds at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington state. Soldiers report “dramatic improvements” in sleep, according to the foundation, as well as significant reductions in pain, stress and the use of prescription medications.

Lynch, the director of “Blue Velvet,” “Mulholland Drive” and the television series “Twin Peaks,” is a longtime practitioner of TM.

“The VA is very interested in what this can do,” Lynch said in a telephone interview Thursday. He acknowledged that many in the military are wary of transcendental meditation, with its New Age and mystic connotations.

“Big-time,” Lynch said. “They’re skeptical until they start hearing stories, or experiencing it for themselves.”

Related articles: Washington Post: Does Transcendental Meditation help veterans with PTSD? | POLITICO: Coping with PTSD | Norwich University President Receives “Resilient Warrior Award” at National Veterans Summit in Washington, DC | Huffington Post: David Lynch Brings Transcendental Meditation To D.C.

Norwich University President Receives “Resilient Warrior Award” at National Veterans Summit in Washington, DC

May 4, 2012

Norwich University President was honored with the “Resilient Warrior Award” during a National Veterans Summit in Washington, DC for his leadership in exploring the use of Transcendental Meditation in building resilient warriors

“The disturbing prevalence of PTSD among returning troops underlines the need for more effective resilience training among our cadets.” — Norwich University President Richard W. Schneider, RADM USCGR (Ret.)

Washington, DC (PRWEB) May 03, 2012

Dr. Richard W. Schneider, RADM USCGR (Ret.), the 23rd President of Norwich University in Northfield, Vt., received the inaugural “Resilient Warrior Award” for 2012 during a national summit on “Resilience, the Brain and Meditation,” held on Thursday, May 3, at the Army and Navy Club in Washington D.C.

The award was presented to President Schneider by veterans of four wars who direct Operation Warrior Wellness, a division of the David Lynch Foundation 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, which has provided Transcendental Meditation (TM) scholarships for more than 250,000 at-risk youth and veterans and their families who suffer from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

The award cites Schneider for “leading and training a new generation of resilient warriors who will safeguard America and secure the peace with honor and integrity.”

Under Schneider’s leadership, Norwich University recently completed the initial phase of a long-term, longitudinal, randomized controlled trial with 60 cadets, investigating the effects of TM on psychological distress and resilience. Key results of the first nine-week period included reduced perceived stress, improved constructive thinking, decreased state anxiety, increased behavioral coping, reduced depression and improved dispositional resilience.

“Norwich is proud to be in partnership with the David Lynch Foundation and the Educational Foundation of America for providing the resources for this wonderful effort,” Schneider said.

“The disturbing prevalence of PTSD among returning troops underlines the need for more effective resilience training among our cadets. Based on existing data and preliminary results of ongoing trials at Norwich, I believe the Transcendental Meditation technique represents an essential tool to promote resilience in cadets.”

Ed Schloeman, CMS (Ret.), national co-chair of Operation Warrior Wellness, praised President Schneider for “equipping his cadets with the most important of tools—one that will help them overcome stress and promote resilience throughout their life in the military—throughout their life. He is a great educator, a wise man, and a true leader.”

After receiving the news of the award, Schneider said: “I am honored to accept this award on behalf of all those who have worked so hard on this project to experiment with providing our future soldiers, sailors, and airmen the tools necessary to become more resilient, even better warriors, and better human beings.”

Other speakers at the Summit included W. Scott Gould, the US Deputy Secretary of the Veterans Administration, and Norman Rosenthal, M.D., clinical professor of psychiatry, Georgetown University Medical School and author of a breakthrough research study, which found a 50% reduction in the symptoms of PTSD among veterans who practice TM.

Reported in newstimes.com. Related articles: Washington Post: Does Transcendental Meditation help veterans with PTSD? | POLITICO: Coping with PTSD | Washington Post: VA testing whether meditation can help treat PTSD |

POLITICO: Coping with PTSD

May 4, 2012
Opinion Contributor
Coping with PTSD

More than 500,000 returning veterans suffer from psychological injuries, the author said. | AP Photo

By RICHARD W. SCHNEIDER | 5/3/12 9:24 AM EDT

Developing military leaders who are smart, strong and courageous — both on and off of the battlefield — is essential. We are still learning how to create soldiers prepared for the emotional wounds of war. We need to teach coping skills to help these men and women reduce the terrible effects of post-traumatic stress disorder.

Veterans, who have experienced the horrors of war, are the most common sufferers. More than 500,000 returning veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan suffer from psychological injuries — including PTSD or major depression.

But even military cadets, when in a highly disciplined and rigorous academic environment, can feel similarly overwhelmed. Under intense stress, many men and women just give up. They don’t have the tools to stay focused and grounded.

We must give them the tools they need. This means helping them to be successful socially, emotionally and in a military setting. Our future leaders need this knowledge.

Transcendental Meditation has demonstrated an ability to help those suffering from PTSD and high stress environments. Recent trials of TM’s effects on psychological distress have revealed: reduced perceived stress, improved constructive thinking, decreased state anxiety, increased behavioral coping and reduced depression. This is the focus of the David Lynch Foundation, which highlights TM’s positive effects.

TM helps military cadets become more resilient, according to Norwich University studies, so that they can be better soldiers on the battlefield as well as better equipped to recover from the traumas of war and have a normal life after returning home.

Evidence suggests that TM may help people handle the stresses that come before as well as during military service and when they return to civilian life.

A 2011 Norwich University study, with funding from the David Lynch Foundation and the Educational Foundation of America, showed the positive effects that TM can have on helping students cope with the stresses of leadership in being a member of the Norwich University Corps of Cadets. TM has proven to be a highly effective coping strategy and has set a high bar to further explorations and research.

Many cadets who enter the military will likely be exposed to trauma that can have a destructive effect on their lives and the lives of their families. Whether a veteran or a military cadet, the method of dealing with PTSD is crucial.

For these “invisible wounds” can take a high toll — on family, quality of life and work performance. There is also a greater risk for violent and self-destructive behavior.

Effective treatments have been difficult to identify. Many expensive combinations of chemicals, for example, have been explored. But TM is an evidence-based technique that is available anywhere and at any time. Those who practice it develop the ability to improve daily stresses in the workplace and in life.

The technique helps address anxiety, mood change and situational awareness. Its powerful impact can produce long-term results in improving daily lives.

The goal is clear: to develop the whole person with maximized abilities and capacity in all situations.

Richard W. Schneider, a rear admiral USCGR (Ret.) is the president of Norwich University. The David Lynch Foundation on Thursday is hosting its first annual National Summit, investigating effects of Transcendental Meditation on active-duty personnel and veterans suffering from PTSD, cadets in training — and their families.

Short URL: http://politi.co/JPLv7Z

Related articles: Washington Post: Does Transcendental Meditation help veterans with PTSD? | Norwich University President Receives “Resilient Warrior Award” at National Veterans Summit in Washington, DC | Washington Post: VA testing whether meditation can help treat PTSD

Washington Post: Does Transcendental Meditation help veterans with PTSD?

May 4, 2012

Posted at 02:45 PM ET, 05/03/2012.
This story has been updated. Previously titled: Summit Examines Use of Transcendental Meditation to help Vets with PTSD. Later published in Washington Post: VA testing whether meditation can help treat PTSD

Does Transcendental Meditation help veterans with PTSD?

By Steve Vogel

Seeking new ways to treat post-traumatic stress, the Department of Veteran Affairs is studying the use of transcendental meditation to help returning veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan.

“The reality is not all individuals we see are treatable by the techniques we use,” said W. Scott Gould, deputy secretary for the Department of Veterans Affairs, told a summit on the use of TM to treat post traumatic stress Thursday in Washington.

Director David Lynch founded a charitable organization that funded a summit on using Transcendental Meditation to treat military veterans with PTSD. (David Livingston – GETTY IMAGES)

The VA is spending about $5 million on a dozen trials involving several hundred veterans from a range of conflicts, including Iraq and Afghanistan. Results from the trials will not be available for another 12 to 18 months.

But Gould said he was “encouraged” by the results of trials which were presented at the summit.

Two independent pilot studies of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans showed a 50 percent reduction in symptoms of post-traumatic stress after eight weeks, according to the summit’s sponsor, the David Lynch Foundation, a charitable organization founded by the American filmmaker and television director.

Results from the initial phase of a long-term trial investigating the effects of Transcendental Meditation on 60 cadets at Norwich University, a private military college in Vermont, have been encouraging, school officials said at the summit, held at The Army and Navy Club.

Students practising TM showed measurable improvement in the areas of academic performance and discipline over a control group. “The statistical effect we found in only two months was surprisingly large,” Carole Bandy, an associate professor of psychology who is directing the study at the university, said at the summit.

“For us, it’s all about the evidence,” said Richard W. Schneider, president of the university, who added that he was a skeptic before the trial began.

“Conventional approaches fall woefully short of the mark, so we clearly need a new approach,” Norman Rosenthal, a clinical professor of of psychiatry at Georgetown University Medical School.

Operation Warrior Wellness, a division of the foundation, is providing TM training to troops recovering from wounds at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington state. Troops report “dramatic improvements” in sleep, according to the foundation, as well as significant reductions in pain, stress and the use of prescription medications

Lynch, the director of “Blue Velvet,” “Mullholland Drive” and the television series “Twin Peaks,” is a longtime practitioner of TM, a meditative practice advocates say helps manage stress and depression.

Related articles: POLITICO: Coping with PTSD | Norwich University President Receives “Resilient Warrior Award” at National Veterans Summit in Washington, DC | Huffington Post: David Lynch Brings Transcendental Meditation To D.C.

The H20 Network on Blog Talk Radio interviews Janet Hoffman about Transcendental Meditation

May 2, 2012

Click on this link to go to the website and listen to this great interview! http://www.blogtalkradio.com/theh2onetwork/2012/05/02/transcendental-meditation-with-janet-hoffman

Janet Hoffman has 42 years of experience working on the international, national, regional, and local levels of the Transcendental Meditation program in leadership, organizational, creative development, and teaching positions. After 40 years of directing the New York City TM center, Janet became the nationwide Director of the TM program for women professionals She learned the TM technique in 1968, became a TM teacher in 1971, and directed five TM teacher training courses under the guidance of the program’s founder, Maharishi Mahesh Yogi.

To sign up for the July conference on women and consciousness go to: http://www.gmdousa.org/4Day.

For more information on the Transcendental Meditation program: http://tmwomenprofessionals.org, http://www.tm.org, 800-635-7173.

Donovan and Deepak talk about meditation, music, on abc carpet & home via livestream

May 2, 2012

Astrid Stawiarz/Getty Images

Here’s an online streaming event with Donovan and Deepak talking about the old days with Maharishi, Transcendental Meditation, The Beatles, and the music from the 60’s. Thanks to Linda, Donovan’s wife and muse, for suggesting Donovan be on this special event: http://livestre.am/1IWyp on abc carpet & home via @livestream.

Also see: Donovan shares his excitement and fulfillment after playing at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame | Billboard interview: Donovan Q&A: Catching Up With a Folk Rock Superman | Ode to Donovan by Meghan for Altavoz: Conan introduces Donovan while holding the DLF Music vinyl box-set “Music That Changes The World” | Donovan Inducted into Rock and Roll Hall of Fame | Donovan and Ben Lee on Good Day LA | The former Beatles Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr reunion for David Lynch’s benefit concert airs on New York’s THIRTEEN, Sunday, April 29


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