Posts Tagged ‘Fairfield’

Veterans speak out on post-traumatic stress, offer a proven way to heal PTSD

July 18, 2012

Jerry Yellin, WWII Veteran and author of four books, speaks with fellow vet Luke Jensen on how they survived PTSD.  KTVO’S Kate Allt

FAIRFIELD, IOWA — Across the country, more and more veterans are returning home from war with symptoms of post-traumatic stress. Veterans who have been home for decades still struggle with traumatic experiences and memories.

Two Iowa veterans are inviting all soldiers from all wars and their families to the Sondheim Center in Fairfield, Iowa on July 28 to hear how a unique lesson went miles to improve the quality of their lives.

Jerry Yellin is not only a veteran of World War II and the author of four books, he has dedicated his life to helping veterans of all wars and their families. Yellin met Vietnam vet Ed Schloeman in 2010 and after both of them learned Transcendental Meditation, and saw the immediate benefits to their health and well-being, Operation Warrior Wellness was born.

Yellin knows first-hand what combat can do to a person’s mental and physical health.

“On August 14, the war was over and I came home and I was an empty shell at the age of 21,” he said. “Combat took everything out of me. I had a pure purpose for life, pure purpose for living, pure purpose for serving my government, serving my country, and then no purpose of life for 30 years. Stressed out, many jobs, and then I learned Transcendental Meditation, and I got my life back. There are hundreds upon hundreds of thousands of families – not only soldiers – but families, suffering from post traumatic stress and stress is relieved by Transcendental Meditation.”

Yellin firmly believes that Transcendental Meditation, or TM, saved his life. His, and many others. He has saved countless testimonials from veterans across the country who have seen the effects of TM work wonders on them and their families.

Luke Jensen of Des Moines is just one example. He returned from Afghanistan three years ago a broken man.

“I tried many, many things that did not work for me,” Jensen said. “And my family continued to push me to try new things, to get help when I first got back from Afghanistan. I wasn’t having any luck with anything or getting relief from anything until I learned TM with Jerry. It can change your life, and it did for myself and for Jerry and for many other veterans who went through – I know veterans who went through much worse, more experiences than I did and it helped them.”

Even scientists say TM has a relieving effect on the brain, and helps get rid of traumatic and stressful experiences stored into memory. Dr. Fred Travis, at the Center for Brain, Consciousness, and Cognition at Maharishi University, said the brain is not constant and unchanging. Rather, experience changes the brain, and oftentimes, traumatic or stressful experiences leave a permanent effect on the brain, and the amygdala – the fear center – is permanently turned on.

The way to reverse that change in the brain is to offer a direct opposite experience, one of calmness and deep thought.

“What Transcendental Meditation seems to do is turns off the amygdala and suddenly the person – remember, the brain is the interface between inner and outer – so now suddenly the person can see the situation in a different way,” said Dr. Travis. “This is what we see in the research of veterans of the Vietnam era, of Iraq, of Afghanistan, is the process of transcending from TM helps them very quickly reduce flashbacks, eliminate the anger and anxiety inside allowing them to sleep, allowing their heart and feelings to flow towards other people.”

“It helped me become a person, helped me become a better person, better husband, better father, a better person with a purpose in life,” Yellin said. “And I would like every veteran to expose themselves to this modality of Transcendental Meditation.”

This news report aired Wednesday, July 18, 2012 on ABC 3 and CBS 3.2.

To learn more about the July 28, 2 pm event – Healing the Hidden Wounds of War – at the Sondheim in Fairfield, or to register, visit http://operationwarriorwellness.org/iowa.

Find out more here: Healing the Hidden Wounds of War: open forum for Iowa veterans and their families affected by PTSD, sponsored by Operation Warrior Wellness

Here is a wonderful  interview with Jerry Yellin and Lisa Cypers Kamen of Harvesting Happiness Talk Radio July 18th. You can listen online to Jerry Yellin, Operation Warrior Wellness and Debbie Gregory, Military Connection or download the the podcast.

Other news coverage:  WHO-TV 13 News: WARRIOR WELLNESS: Healing Hidden Wounds with Meditation for Veterans  |  Des Moines Register: Fairfield and Ames war veterans team up to bring meditation (TM) to fellow Iowa vets with PTSD  |  Fairfield Ledger cover article by Diane Vance: Combat stress subject of public forum Saturday Story County Veteran Once Suicidal Finds Relief from PTSD with Transcendental Meditation: AmesPatch article by Jessica Miller

James McCartney sings Angel on David Letterman

January 31, 2012

Posted on James McCartney.

James appeared on the Late Show with David Letterman January 30, 2012. On that show Dave welcomed actress Jennifer Lopez, actor Rob Schneider from the CBS comedy series “Rob!”, and musical guest James McCartney. You can watch the full show here. ©CBS, All Rights Reserved.

James had played 2 days, Jan 23-24, at the Sundance Film Festival the previous week. Here he is drawing a picture of a fan and signing autographs after one of those concerts. He also played at the Viper Room after he appeared on GDLA. James made his US Television debut when he sang Angel on Good Day LA from his album “The Complete EP Collection.”

Awesome song! He played it for a few of us who were fortunate enough to see him on his first visit to Fairfield, and later on a David Lynch Weekend at the Sondheim Theater. You knew it was going to be a hit, and he was going to be a star. James is a quiet unassuming person, and a very talented young man. We wish him much success in his chosen career.

Here’s one of two photos of James at the Late Show rehearsal posted on his Facebook. You can follow James on Twitter @JamesMcCartney, and  visit the James McCartney Website: http://www.jamesmccartney.com.

See some earlier press coverage on James: Paul McCartney and Nancy show up to see James play, and surprise the small Brighton club audience | Audience Goes Wild for James McCartney | Paul McCartney’s son says he’s ready to follow in dad’s footsteps | McCartney wins over Fairfield audience in U.S. debut concert.

A year and a half later, July 29-30, 2013, James makes a return visit to Letterman. See James McCartney sings new single ‘Wisteri’ on David Letterman and ABC NEWS What’s The Buzz.

Maharishi University hopes to set the standard for “green” buildings

April 28, 2010

Maharishi University hopes to set the standard for “green” buildings

by Matt Kelley on April 26, 2010

in Education, Health & Medicine

A new classroom and research building is under construction on a college campus in southeast Iowa that aims to set a new global standard for green buildings.

David Fisher, director of the Sustainable Living program at Maharishi University in Fairfield, says the building promises to be unlike any other structure on the planet.

“It will be off the grid completely with respect to electricity, heating, cooling, water and waste disposal,” Fisher says. “In addition, the building will be day lit throughout the building.”

Banks of solar panels will provide the electricity for the Sustainable Living Center, Fisher says, and solar energy is being used by workers during the construction phase, as well. During the warm months, he says the building will be kept cool using a geothermal system.

“The heating will be done with solar water heaters on the roof,” Fisher says. “We will have insulation provided in part by very local materials, that is compacted earth blocks which came from some earth right across the street that was being cleared out for a parking lot.” That dirt was compacted into 26,000 bricks that will make up the building’s insulation. The building’s skeleton will use whole tree post and beam techniques.

“Water will be all rainwater,” Fisher says. “It will be collected on the roof and stored in a cistern and, of course, for drinking purposes, it’ll all be filtered with (an ultraviolet) filter.” Fisher says the system for handling waste is also accounted for as a green effort. Fisher says, “We have a constructed wetland and we’re planning to use a system that’s similar to what they use in submarines and on space capsules, purifying the water with a system that puts very, very finely-divided bubbles through the water to keep it aerobic and to completely degrade all of the organic matter so as to purify the water.”

Fisher says the building is designed to meet the Living Building Challenge, the highest standard for sustainable design and green building in the world. It will also be the first to combine that standard with the standards of LEED Platinum certification, Building Biology and Maharishi Vedic Architecture.

The building will serve as the base for the university’s Sustainable Living major. It will have classrooms, a workshop, a meeting room, a greenhouse, a kitchen, a research lab, a recycling center and offices. Fisher says it’ll be a building that teaches. The one-point-seven million dollar project is expected to be complete late this year.

‘Green’ learning in sustainable classrooms

April 23, 2010

Local News April 23, 2010

‘Green’ learning in sustainable classrooms

Maharishi University of Management constructs an off-the-grid academic building for sustainable living majors

MATT MILNER Courier Staff Writer

Matt Milner/The Courier Construction workers had to move carefully to avoid excessive damage to the tree trunks that will be a signature element in the new building for MUM’s sustainable living program. The school held a ceremony at the site on Thursday to mark Earth Day

FAIRFIELD — Builders and backers of the new home for sustainable living majors at Maharishi University of Management say nothing like it has been attempted anywhere.

It’s easy to believe them.

The construction brings together four basic philosophies. Three are focused on environmental impact and resource demands. The fourth is, as all new buildings at the college are, based on Vedic concepts. It’s a tough combination to pull off.

When complete, the building will be completely off the grid for electrical power, climate control and waste removal. The goal is creation of a building that meets the university’s needs for classroom and office space while demonstrating concepts the students learn inside.

Dr. David Fisher, director of the sustainable living department, thinks the building will help draw students. That has not been a problem for the program, which opened in 2003 with six students and now has 80 sustainable living majors. He called it an “incredible environmental building.”

It is not large as academic buildings go. That’s intentional.

“We didn’t want to make it too large because we’re trying to do so much,” Fisher said.

Right now the site doesn’t look markedly different from any other building under construction. Stud framed walls are the exterior on two sides. The other two are still open. The biggest clues that something different is going on are the nearly full-sized tree trunks that form part of one hallway. Others lay around the site, ready to be raised.

The trees being used are aspens. They are fast-growing and were harvested from a farm dedicated to sustaining its population. A slight sheen and a lack of bark are the only things that show they have been processed for construction. Builders said the trunks have strength similar to steel when they are maintained instead of sawed into boards.

Dal Loiselle, the developer and construction manager for the site, has worked on “green” building sites for 21 years. He said the costs are not all that different from those involved in traditional construction, provided the effort is made from the start. Adding environmentally friendly traits to an existing project can be expensive.

“It entails commitment, basically,” he said. “It’s just a matter of having the desire and doing it.”

Loiselle emphasized that none of the technology being incorporated is new. It’s off the shelf stuff that any builder can use.

The completed structure will be LEED platinum certified and meet the requirements for building biology, Vedic architecture and the Living Building Challenge. Students will have access to the roof and walls to study the concepts they learn in class. Monitors will track every shift in temperature, humidity and environmental change, wired into a website people can check from anywhere in the world.

Thursday’s ceremony was somewhere between a groundbreaking and a dedication, tied into Earth Day at MUM. It’s the 40th Earth Day, noted Fairfield Mayor Ed Malloy. He expressed the hope that the building’s edge-of-the-envelope attempt today will be standard in another 40 years.

Matt Milner can be reached at (641) 683-5359 or via e-mail at mmilner@ottumwacourier.com

Award-winning journalist pursues master’s degree at Maharishi University in Fairfield, Iowa

February 9, 2010

Daily Gate City captures awards

By the Daily Gate City
Published: Tuesday, February 9, 2010 11:48 AM CST

The Daily Gate City received six awards in this year’s Iowa Newspaper Association’s Better Newspaper Contests.

Nearly 4,000 entries in dozens of categories were judged by class, based on circulation. The Daily Gate City competed in Daily Class 1, which includes dailies with circulations of 9,999 and less.

The newspaper and staff writer Cindy Iutzi placed first in the best spot news story category with a story about a group of teenagers who floated down the Des Moines River and were stranded on an island overnight.

The Daily Gate City and Iutzi and staff writer Diane Vance finished second in the best news story category with a story about sexting, a practice in which sexually-suggestive and explicit photos are sent over cell phones.

The newspaper finished third with its coverage of education during the contest period. Most of the articles were written by Vance, who has left the paper and is pursuing a master’s degree at Maharishi University in Fairfield now.

The Daily Gate City and Iutzi received a third-place award in the best news photo category with a photo of the Parkersburg tornado taken at a storm spotters’ seminar in Keokuk.

Amanda Grotts of the DGC’s composing department placed third in the best ad designer category with a group of different ads.

In addition, the newspaper was judged third in the best newspaper Web site category.

The awards were presented Friday during the INA 2010 Convention and Trade Show in Des Moines.

The Des Moines Register was named the INA’s Newspaper of the Year for 2010. The Muscatine Journal placed first in general excellence among the Class 1 dailies.

Copyright © 2010 – Daily Gate City

Diane Vance graduated from Maharishi University of Management with a graduate degree in education, left to teach at a school, then returned to Fairfield to write, very well, for the Fairfield Ledger. Here is a personal article about her journey to Finding peace in Fairfield.

Audience Goes Wild for James McCartney

November 15, 2009
the hawk eye

This Burlington Hawk Eye article was picked up by NewsBlaze.


Audience Goes Wild for James McCartney

By Bob Saar

Rocker James McCartney played his U.S. debut last night at Fairfield’s new Sondheim Center. The two shows were part of the David Lynch Foundation’s fourth annual “Change Begins Within” weekend at Maharishi University.

McCartney, son of Beatle Paul, opened a three-ring musical circus that included Iowan Laura Dawn and folk legend Donovan.

“It’s very different having a famous father,” film director Lynch quipped when introducing McCartney. “My father was Elvis Presley.”

The audience, heavily weighted with aging ’60s boomers, went wild when the 32-year-old singer/guitarist walked on stage with Light, his band.

The four-piece slammed right into their first number as a video crew taped the show for the DLF Web site.

McCartney’s’ music was racy and frenetic, and the 400-plus seat Sondheim has well-designed acoustics that allowed the amps-on-stage rock band to deliver without overwhelming.

James looks a bit like Paul with a shaved head. Ah, those eyes. He is not left-handed, and he played a Fender Stratocaster given to him by Carl Perkins.

His voice was high and clear like his father’s, but at times, he sounded more like John Lennon when roughing things up.

“James has a way with melody and a set of pipes which are more than a match for his dad’s,” Lynch said.

His songwriting style has eerie nuances of the Beatles. “Spirit Guides,” featuring McCartney on piano, bore a haunting resemblance to “Lady Madonna.”

Every song charged ahead with strange melodies flavored with grunge, perhaps like Nirvana covering side two of Abbey Road, backed by the Ramones.

McCartney was stoic, mumbling only song titles between songs.

Laura Dawn and her New York blues-rock band Little Death came out blazing away and had the audience on its feet and dancing before their first song was 12 bars deep.

Dawn, a native of Pleasantville, is a stunning vocalist at the wheel of a powerhouse. She’s somewhat like Janice Joplin before the booze and cigarettes, or perhaps Martina McBride after a night of heavy pubcrawling.

Little Death and their sweetly trashed-out backup duo – the Death Threats – blasted the audience into happy submission, a road-and-bar band with a refined stage presence.

1960s legend Donovan closed the show with a set of hits, from “Catch the Wind” to “Sunshine Superman,” delivered in his trademark quavering voice. Donovan, along with the Beatles and the Beach Boys, brought Transcendental Meditation out of India into Western thought, which ultimately brought Fairfield to the forefront of the practice.

Little Death and the redressed and fully sequined Death Threats backed the folksinger for most of his set. The finale featured the entire cast, including McCartney, singing “Mellow Yellow” with Donovan and the crowd.

After the show, someone asked McCartney if he enjoyed playing in Iowa.

“Yeah, yeah, yeah,” the taciturn singer said. “Definitely.”

—————————————————————————————————————

My Comment:

*WOW! Saar nailed it-every part of it! And the second set was even livelier. Donovan invited Fairfield guitarist Arthur Lee Land on stage for his last two finales, that had Dawn’s husband, lead guitarist Daron Murphy, trading solos with Lee Land, leading to a coherent close, which brought the audience to its feet. What a night! Thank you David Lynch and Fairfield!!

SOURCE: http://www.thehawkeye.com/story/McCartney-review-111509

Other news coverage: McCartney wins over Fairfield audience in U.S. debut concert and Paul McCartney’s son says he’s ready to follow in dad’s footsteps. A few years later James McCartney sings Angel on David Letterman, and performed at the Sundance Film Festival. Enjoy this popular news story: Paul McCartney and Nancy show up to see James play, and surprise the small Brighton club audience.

Upcoming Anthology of Fairfield Poets

October 20, 2009

THIS ENDURING GIFT

A Flowering of Fairfield Poetry

76 Poets Who Found Common Ground in One Small Prairie Town

Original Poems Selected with Introductions by Freddy Niagara Fonseca.  Foreword by Donovan.  Endorsements from Mary Swander, Poet Laureate of Iowa, Walter Butts, Poet Laureate of New Hampshire, Kira Rosner, Author of When Souls Take Flight. 1st World Publishing. To order advance copies of THIS ENDURING GIFT go to: http://www.thisenduringgift.com/

Ken Chawkin copyrights all poems presented for consideration in this poetry anthology by Fairfield Poets, edited by Freddy Niagara Fonseca, to be published in 2010. Not all of them will make it into the final publication, but they are available online here for a limited time. That site has been removed, but you can see my published poems in This Enduring Gift: A Flowering of Fairfield Poetry.

Poetry — The Art of The Voice

Five Haiku from 13 Ways to Write Haiku: A Poet’s Dozen

Committed

Cold Wet Night

Thinking of You Today

Ode To The Artist: Sketching Lotus Pads at Round Prairie Park

© Ken Chawkin

STOLCEL Receives Honorary PhD at MUM

September 28, 2009

Times•Colonist

Saving native languages

By Jeff Bell, Victoria Times Colonist

September 27, 2009

John Elliott’s years of dedication to preserving aboriginal languages — including Sencoten, the language of the Saanich First Nation — has earned him an honorary PhD.

Elliott, also known by his Saanich name, Stolcel, received the recognition from Maharishi University of Management in Iowa during a major international conference called “Building Healthy, Sustainable American Indian Communities.” Native leaders from across North America are attending the gathering, which wraps up today.

Elliott, a resident of the Tsartlip reserve and a teacher at the Lauwelnew Tribal School, is a co-founder of FirstVoices.com, a web-based aboriginal-language archive. The concept has prompted more than 60 First Nations to use online services to archive their languages, as well.

Elliott’s work with language preservation goes back 30 years, and has drawn from the efforts of his late father, Dave. Elliott first began looking at computers and digital videos in his work in 1999, and went on to develop FirstVoices.com with colleague Peter Brand.

(Mentioned in column: Good News: Makeover planned for Casa Maria emergency house)

http://bit.ly/Stolcel

June 10, 2019, UVIC, University of Victoria, bestowed an Honorary Doctor of Education (DEd) on STOLȻEȽ John Edward Elliott Sr. Visit their website for details.

INDIAN COUNTRY TODAY: Sustainability quest: Tribes to gather for conference of meditation and renewal

September 11, 2009

Indian Country Today

Sustainability quest

Tribes to gather for conference of meditation and renewal

By Rob Capriccioso

Story Published: Sep 15, 2009

FAIRFIELD, Iowa – Organizers are preparing for a unique gathering of tribal elders, leaders and members to focus on building sustainable communities through meditation, renewable energy, organic agriculture and cultural preservation.

The event, billed as the “International Conference on Building Healthy, Sustainable American Indian Communities,” is largely being put together by the Hocak Elders Council, the Ho-Chunk Elders Advisory Council, the David Lynch Foundation and members of the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska.

It will be held at the Maharishi University of Management in Fairfield, Iowa Sept. 25 – 27. Planners expect hundreds of participants to attend.

“We are very excited to be able to help offer this one-of-a-kind experience,” said Bob Roth, vice president of the David Lynch Foundation, which focuses on spreading scientifically-proven stress-reduction Transcendental Meditation technique to at-risk youth.

The meditation techniques focus on regular, quiet reflection times aimed at reducing stress and its harmful health impacts.

Studies have shown the methods to have health benefits, such as curbing behavioral disorders in youth and reducing the need for insulin in those with Type 2 diabetes.

Planners with the foundation are using the conference as a platform to highlight their commitment for the past three years to a project called the “Model American Indian Community Initiative” on the Winnebago Reservation.

The project strives to help at-risk youth relieve stress through meditation. It has achieved some promising results which conference organizers are eager to share.

John Boncheff, an event organizer who co-directs the Winnebago project, said Indian youth in the program are not only doing better in school, they are absent less and have a better chance of graduating.

Esteemed Indian leaders have taken note. Joe A. Garcia, president of the National Congress of American Indians; Robert Cook, president of the National Indian Education Association; Lucille Echohawk, a strategic planner for Casey Family Programs; and Kevin Skenandore, acting director of the Bureau of Indian Education are scheduled to attend and present at the sustainability gathering.

The Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota and the Passamaquoddy Tribe of Maine have started similar projects, hoping for equally positive results. Planners said many more tribal leaders have requested information.

Roth said it has been an honor to see more tribes get involved and for Native Americans to teach each other the benefits of healthy meditation and its similarity to some traditional spiritual beliefs.

Prosper Waukon, a leader with the Hocak Elders Council and a citizen of the Winnebago Tribe, said the project has also attracted keen interest from his tribe’s elders.

In 2007, Waukon said several older tribal members took a trip to Maharishi University to learn about transcendental meditation, which the institution strongly promotes. Many were suffering from debilitating side effects of diabetes and wanted to understand ways to meditate to improve their well-being.

Some of the elders have since been able to dramatically better their health outcomes, and some rely much less on diabetes medications, Waukon said.

“Many elders found there was something missing with medication alone. Using meditation to relieve stress ended up helping them connect with traditional ways. It has been a win-win situation.”

As a part of studying the elders’ progress, IHS has contributed $560,000 to the project in in-kind testing services. They are hopeful that IHS may end up promoting the program to more tribes in the future upon seeing positive results.

Information about the elder diabetes program will also be highlighted at the conference.

Waukon said the event won’t just be about promoting sustainability through meditation. It will also feature sessions on organic farming, wind and solar energy development and cultural preservation.

“These are areas of sustainability that all connect to each other,” he said, adding that experts in the various fields will be in attendance.

Boncheff would like the conference to raise awareness of the Winnebago project’s success and to see what can be done to take it to the next level. He is hopeful that at least seven more tribes launch similar sustainability projects by next year.

For people who can’t afford to attend the conference, it will be Web cast online. Registration information and more details are also available online.

On February 1, 2012, Indian Country Today published an article, Transcendental Meditation Combating Diabetes in Indian Country, by Mary Annette Pember.

David Lynch Foundation Honored

September 10, 2009

Picture 40

Naturalheroes

THE 
DAVID LYNCH 
FOUNDATION

Promotes a Peaceful World  For Our Children

By Tom Citrano

NATHEROSDavidLynch“In today’s world of fear and uncertainty, 
every child should have one class period a day to dive within himself and experience the field of silence – bliss – the enormous reservoir of energy and intelligence that is deep within all of us. This is the way to save the coming generation.” David Lynch, founder and chairman of the David Lynch Foundation for Consciousness-Based Education and 
World Peace.

This month’s Natural Heroes are Mr. Lynch and the people at the David Lynch Foundation. Director and Producer David Lynch (Blue Velvet, Twin Peaks, Elephant Man, Eraserhead, Mulholland Drive) started his foundation to provide funds for students to learn meditation through Transcendental Meditation centers, hospital-sponsored wellness programs, boys and girls clubs, before-and-after school programs and in schools when invited by the administration.

Instruction is voluntary and provided to children after parental permission has been granted and at no cost to the family, organization or school. This year the David Lynch Foundation granted millions of dollars guaranteeing thousands of students, teachers and families a chance to learn meditation.  The Foundation also funds independent research to study the effects of meditation on creativity, intelligence, brain function, academic performance, ADHD and additional learning disorders, substance abuse and depression.

Lynch believes that stress is taking a big toll on children today. He looks for a day when developing student’s creative potential is part of every school’s curriculum. David Lynch has been a TM practitioner for over 30 years and explains, “There are hundreds of schools, thousands of students, who are eager to relieve stress and bring out the full potential of every student by providing this Consciousness-based education.”

The David Lynch Foundation targets the benefits of TM for students in the following areas:

CLASSROOM STRESS

Children need to feel safe in school because pressure, stress and fear undermine learning. Dr. William Stixrud, Ph.D., a clinical neuropsychologist in Silver Spring, Maryland, specializing in work with children and adolescents, has studied the effects of stress on the developing brain and had this to say about the David Lynch Foundations programs, “Educators have long known the optimal mind/body state of a student is one of relaxed alertness. The question has been how does the student get there? The answer is The Transcendental Meditation Program.”

CLINICAL DEPRESSION
Ten million children in America have been diagnosed as clinically depressed and take antidepressant medications. Most of these medications are categorized as having serious side effects. A study (funded in part by the Daimler/Chrysler Fund and the General Motors Foundation) on meditating children at an inner-city Detroit middle school confirms what previous gathered data and research has documented: The Transcendental Meditation program increases happiness, self-esteem, and self-worth, while also reducing anxiety and depression.

LEARNING 
DISORDERS
If left untreated, ADHD impacts the child in several ways – causing impulsivity, distractibility, hyperactivity and inattentiveness. ADHD is also associated with sleep disorders, depression, bipolar disorder and other disorders. Almost 90% of children diagnosed with ADHD are on medications. Linda Handy, Ph.D., educator and principal of The Waldorf School in Silver Spring, Maryland believes it’s easier for teachers to hold the attention of students who meditate, “Transcendental Meditation has a great effect on students’ learning ability. Teachers can teach more – so students can learn more.”

HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

High blood pressure is no longer an adult disease. Studies show adolescence is a critical time for the development of hypertension and other coronary disease risk factors. Increasing rates of childhood obesity are further driving up the numbers of children and teens living with hypertension. Vernon Barnes, Ph.D., research scientist at the Georgia Prevention Institute of the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta studied the effects of TM on a random sample selected from a group of 5,000 teens with hypertension. Barnes had this to say about the results, “Decreases in blood pressure observed in the present study have clinical significance. The decreases, if maintained into adulthood, are enough to potentially decrease a child’s long-term risk for heart disease and stroke.”

FULL BRAIN POTENTIAL

Science has confirmed that our brains are not fully developed at birth. As we grow and mature, the brain is being recreated to support all of our new and changing thoughts, decision and behavior. There are different areas of the brain for seeing, hearing, thinking, feeling, etc. The part of the brain that is most critical for evaluating all the information is the frontal lobes. Stressful experiences keep the frontal lobes from developing. Research verifies the TM technique is unique in its ability to exercise this critical part of the brain – to make the brain healthier and better able to work together as a whole.

ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

In his book, A Record of Excellence, Ashley Deans, Ph.D., director of The Maharishi School in Fairfield, Iowa recounts the achievements of his school, which is accredited by the State of Iowa and the Independent Schools Association of the Central States, “Hundreds of scientific studies on Transcendental Meditation program and more than 30 years of classroom experience should be enough to convince anyone that Consciousness-Based education can make education complete, healthy, harmonious and productive.”

For more information about 
the David Lynch Foundation 
and its programs, visit davidlynchfoundation.org.

If you have a Natural Hero in 
your life, send an email to: heroes@nugreencity.com and tell us about that special someone who’s making our city and the planet a better place.

http://www.nugreencity.com/2009/09/naturalheroes-3/


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