Posts Tagged ‘Dr. Mehmet Oz’

#TranscendentalMeditation teacher Bob Roth @meditationbob profiled on @50PlusPrime

March 10, 2019

50PlusPrime with Tony Fama is the national TV News Magazine for Baby Boomers celebrating the lives of the 108-million Americans age 50+. Tune in this weekend for a 30-minute special on Bob Roth @meditationbob and the David Lynch Foundation (DLF) with Tony Fama on @50plusprime. They talk about Transcendental Meditation (TM) and how it can bring more creativity, peace, and equanimity to your day.

The Teacher Helping 50+ Celebrities Find Success in Peace

This episode airs on AXS TV, Saturday, March 9, at 8:30am ET, and Sunday, March 10 at 11:30am ET, and in New York City on Sunday at 1:30pm on WABC 7. It was published on the 50PlusPrime TV News Magazine for Baby Boomers YouTube channel Thursday, March 7, 2019.

Tony Fama interviews Bob Roth about his trajectory since he was a young person to today as co-founder of the David Lynch Foundation teaching TM in 35 countries around the world. The show shares excerpts of DLF interviews with students, veterans, and celebrities, like Ellen DeGeneres and Jerry Seinfeld.

In his enthusiastic introduction to the show, Tony says, “This guy’s a product of the sixties, and he’s just a cool cat!” He asks Bob why he’s the go-to-guru for the rich and famous. Bob tells him no one is immune from stress, even the wealthy and famous. They talk among themselves. TM, he tells him, is not a luxury. “It’s a medical intervention, it’s a medicine. It’s a way to reduce stress and wake up the brain.” It makes sense. It cuts healthcare costs, makes you and your employees happier. It’s “a gift of rejuvenation; it’s a gift of awakening; it’s a gift to yourself.”

Tony covers a New York City gala where celebrities like Phil Donahue, Marlo Thomas, Dr. Mehmet Oz, and Orin Synder discuss how Roth, having taught them TM, has enhanced their lives. The show includes clips from Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr talking with David Lynch on why they support the work of the Foundation in benefiting at-risk kids and US military veterans.

Bob Roth on 50PlusPrime TV News Magazine for Baby Boomers

At the end, as the credits roll, Bob Roth sums up the main point of what TM can do for us in a stressful world.

At the same time, stress is real, and if we have headaches, or if we can’t sleep, or if we’re depressed we can’t get out of bed, that stops us from being able to fulfill our desires, to grow. And so, in one simple process of just accessing this field of calm that lies within, we eliminate the buildup of stress, and we unlock that full creative potential of the brain, so we can be more creative and more resilient, and do the things we want to do.

Dr Oz’s gift of TM to his employees resulted in personal and corporate benefits — see the video

May 23, 2013

Dr. Mehmet Oz and his employees discuss the personal and corporate benefits derived from regularly practicing Transcendental Meditation: reduced stress, increased job performance, enhanced creativity, better teamwork, and improved health. Bottom line—his staff are more relaxed, productive, and happier. This more enlightened approach of developing healthier personnel from the inside out on their own time at work also makes good business sense. See the video he made to inspire other companies to do the same for their employees.

Published May 21, 2013 by tmwomenprofessionals

See these related videos: Dr. Oz on Transcendental Meditation | Some Reports on Dr. Oz’s Interview with Oprah about TM and her Next Chapter | Dr. Mehmet Oz explains how we can overcome risk factors for heart disease with meditation | Dr Oz discusses ancient Ayurvedic approaches to weight loss with The Raj expert Candace Badgett and these articles: 14 Executives Who Swear By Meditation–10 do TM and Celebs who meditate featured in The Daily Beast.

Good News Planet Red Carpet Interviews at An Historic Night of Jazz for David Lynch Foundation

December 16, 2012

Good News Planet publicized the David Lynch Foundation‘s Historic Night of Jazz and broadcaster Paul Sladkus showed up on the Red Carpet to ask about Transcendental Meditation and report the good news. Paul interviewed: Dr. Lois Lee, founder of Children of the Night, Ray and Barbara Dalio, David Lynch, Dr. Mehmet and Lisa Oz, Jerry and Jessica Seinfeld, Herbie Hancock, and the lovely Liv Tyler. They share their personal benefits of meditation and its application in helping at-risk students, veterans with PTSD, and girls and women victimized by abuse. The jazz concert was a fundraiser to support these DLF sponsored programs. Visit http://www.changebeginswithin.org to see the jazz artists who performed. See the DLF Gala Benefit Report.


Published on Dec 14, 2012 by GoodNewsBroadcast.
For more information on Good News Broadcast (GNB) visit http://goodnewsplanet.com.

Mail Online gave a report from the Red Carpet with photos of celebrity guests and musicians: All jazzed up: Liv Tyler steals looks on the red carpet at star-studded music gala for the David Lynch Foundation. Photos on m&c: 4th Annual David Lynch Foundation Gala Pictures. Your Tango: Exclusive! Dr. Oz & Liv Tyler On Relationships & Meditation. Read this excellent report in BULLETT by Stella Girkins: Celebrating Transcendental Meditation at the 2012 David Lynch Foundation Benefit Gala, which also includes a video from the David Lynch Foundation: Changing Lives With Meditation.

See the video Highlights from Jazz at Lincoln Center Benefit for David Lynch Foundation. And here are two videos involving some of the recipients on the stage who benefited greatly from the TM program funded by DLF—the lady who was a survivor of Domestic Violence, and the couple in First Responders and Police Officers: Coping with PTSD.

CNN’s Candy Crowley to give Commencement Address at Maharishi University of Management

May 23, 2012

FAIRFIELD, IA: The entire Fairfield community is invited to attend the Maharishi University of Management 2012 Commencement in the Men’s Dome at 1 pm on Saturday, May 26.

A total of 275 degrees will be given to 268 graduating students: 67 undergraduates for 74 degrees, including 7 double-majors, and 201 graduate degrees, for 196 Master’s and 5 Ph.D.

M.U.M.’s Commencement speaker is Candy Crowley, CNN’s award-winning chief political correspondent and anchor of “State of the Union with Candy Crowley,” a political hour of newsmaker interviews and analysis of the week’s most important issues.

In her role as chief political correspondent, Ms. Crowley covers a broad range of stories, including presidential, congressional and gubernatorial races and major legislative developments on Capitol Hill.

Since arriving at CNN from NBC in 1987, Ms. Crowley has won some of broadcasting’s major awards: a Peabody, Emmy, and Gracie Allen Award.

Ms. Crowley has been practicing the Transcendental Meditation technique since 2009. Along with Dr. Mehmet Oz, she was a co-host of the David Lynch Foundation “Change Begins Within” benefit gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City in 2010. She also hosted the 2011 launch for DLF’s Operation Warrior Wellness in Washington, DC.

Ms. Crowley was nominated for a Maharishi Award by the Maharishi University of Management (MUM) Global Student Council this past December but was unable to attend the award ceremony. This award will be presented to her when she is on campus.

“She said she is ‘very honored and excited’ to be able to speak at our 2012 commencement ceremony,” said MUM executive vice-president Craig Pearson.

Candy will be attending many of the Commencement events, but has to return immediately to Washington, DC after graduation in order to anchor her national political talk show on Sunday morning.

Florence Lillian Nickerson is this year’s Salutatorian, and the Valedictorian is Patrik Nils-Olof Siljestam.

The University of Iowa Faculty Brass Quintet will play the music for the Graduation Processional.

Numbers and Types of Degrees

74 Undergraduate degrees:

BA Art 2
BFA 1
BA Business 14
BA in Sustainable Community Development 1
BA in Education 1
BA in Literature 7
BA in Media and Communications 12
BA in Maharishi Vedic Science 2
BA in Physiology and Health 8
BA in Physiology and Health, Pre-Medicine 7
BS in Mathematics 1
BS in Sustainable Living 18

196 Master’s degrees:

MA in Education 3
MA in Maharishi Vedic Science 15
MA in Teaching 3
MBA Sustainable Business 33
MBA Accounting 23
MS Computer Science 119

5 Ph.D. degrees:

Ph.D. in Management 5

During her recent visit to Fairfield, Iowa to deliver the Commencement Address at Maharishi University of Management, CNN chief political correspondent Candy Crowley visited the local community-supported solar-powered radio station, KRUU-FM, to tape an interview on Speaking Freely with Dennis Raimondi. Burt Chojnowski of Fairfield First! Buzz filmed that interview and also asked and posted 3 Questions with Candy Crowley about her impressions of Fairfield, writing, and leadership, recorded on May 26, 2012. You can hear and see those interviews in this new post: Candy Crowley visits KRUU-FM before delivering Commencement Address at Maharishi University.

Also see this article by Diane Vance who spoke with Candy on her way out here and also attended her commencement address: Fairfield Ledger: Crowley speaks to M.U.M. grads.

CNN anchor Candy Crowley gives Commencement Address at Maharishi University of Management is now available on the YouTube channel.

Can meditation save us? Fox News Opinion by Tom McKinley Ball

February 20, 2012

Can meditation save us?

FOX NEWS Opinion by Tom McKinley Ball
Published February 19, 2012 | FoxNews.com

Economic uncertainty, political divisiveness—it seems that our nation and many of us individually are now under more stress than we’re designed to handle.

It’s no surprise that increasing numbers of people are turning to meditation for refuge. And why shouldn’t we? It’s just the natural use of our own minds.

An effective meditation technique allows you to dive deep within and contact reserves of peace, energy and clarity to help you more gracefully accomplish what you wish to achieve in life. It dissolves deep-rooted, accumulated stresses that obstruct your health.

But it’s more than that: meditation can show you who you really are. Not just on the surface but deep within—where reside greater possibilities of creativity and intelligence, untapped potentialities of heart and mind.

Resurgence

“If Transcendental Meditation were a new drug, conferring this many benefits, it would be the biggest, multi-billion dollar blockbuster drug on the market.”—former senior NIH researcher Norman Rosenthal, M.D.

In the 1970s, Transcendental Meditation (“TM”) became a widespread cultural phenomenon. Now there’s a rising new wave of interest in TM, but for different reasons: because there’s so much scientific research verifying its effects.

Doctors and therapists are recommending it in growing numbers.

Business owners offer it as a human resource for employees—such as Oprah Winfrey and her company, Harpo Productions.

Prison systems in the U.S. and abroad are implementing programs for inmates. Hundreds of schools around the world are offering TM-Quiet Time programs for students. But mostly, people are learning it because they notice positive change in someone they know who’s learned.

From a health point of view, meditation can save your life: the deep, restorative rest rejuvenates body and mind and facilitates healing.

Research sponsored by the National Institutes of Health has shown that the TM technique reduces heart attack and stroke by nearly 50%. Clinical trails showed that it reduces cholesterol by 30 milliliters. “If you’re on medication for cholesterol,” says Dr. Mehmet Oz, “we hope you can get 30 milliliters lower. But this happened through Transcendental Meditation alone.”

Besides reducing the major risk factors for heart disease, meditation can also save lives by reducing depression and anxiety, as numerous studies on TM have shown.

“It Saved Me”

I’ve met many people who’ve told me that meditation saved their life. People struggling with high blood pressure who were eventually able to get off their meds after learning TM.

I encountered a Native American woman who said her insulin levels normalized for the first time in years, a few months after learning this meditation. A young woman on the verge of suicide learned the technique, pulled herself out of severe depression and found the wherewithal to return to college for a business degree.

There was the boy with ADHD, who after his first meditation never again needed to wear the Ritalin patch that was stunting his growth.

Hopelessness can be turned into hope when you get to that place within yourself that’s strong enough, resourceful enough to overcome challenges.

Even a person fighting for their life can find solace in meditation: it’s something one can do to help oneself instead of surrendering entirely to the care of others.

Calming the Waters

Here’s the beauty of Transcendental Meditation: it’s a stress-reducing practice that transcends personal opinion, likes and dislikes, beliefs and ideologies. It works on the basis of something deeper and more universal—the mind’s natural tendency.

Our minds naturally seek greater freedom and happiness, greater knowledge. The TM technique allows you to use that natural attraction to happiness in a special way by turning attention inward and finding greater happiness and peace inside you, satisfying the mind’s quest.

But it’s not a selfish thing. Even though you do it for yourself, it’s one of the best things you can do for the people around you.

The flight attendant tells us, in case of emergency, secure your own oxygen mask first. If you don’t, you’ll be useless to help anyone. Meditation allows us to save ourselves from the undertow of stress so we can be sufficiently calm and fully functional to help others.

Bridging the Differences

The TM technique is a secular, non-religious form of meditation involving no beliefs. Many religious people practice it and find that it deepens their spirituality. A physicist friend tells me it refines his appreciation of nature. All the things that define us in the outer world lose their ability to divide us as we familiarize ourselves with that deeper, universal field of order at the basis of the mind—a transcendental level of life that belongs to all of us.

Transcendental Meditation is not a sect. It’s not foreign to our culture because it’s based on natural principles of mind and body that we all share. It’s an effortless technique that anyone can learn, a tool you can use all your life and it gets better with age—it helps you get better with age and stay younger in body, mind and spirit (and yes, there’s research on that).

Tom McKinley Ball is a writer for the David Lynch Foundation. He attended a Transcendental Meditation teacher training course in 1975-76, where he studied with Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, and has taught meditation for almost 40 years.

http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2012/02/19/can-meditation-save-us

The New York Times: Look Who’s Meditating Now

March 19, 2011

Look Who’s Meditating Now

Evan Sung for The New York Times
POSTER BOY Russell Brand with David Lynch at the December Met fundraiser for Mr. Lynch’s foundation, which promotes Transcendental Meditation.

By IRINA ALEKSANDER
Published: March 18, 2011

RUSSELL BRAND, the lanky British comedian, has made a career of his outrageous antics. While a host at MTV UK, he went to work dressed up as Osama bin Laden. At the network’s annual music awards, he likened Britney Spears to a “female Christ.” And he was fired from the BBC after leaving raunchy messages on the voicemail of a 78-year-old actor, a comic bit that even his country’s then-prime minister felt compelled to denounce.

It is jarring then, to say the least, to hear Mr. Brand, 35, speaking passionately and sincerely about the emotional solace he has found in Transcendental Meditation, or TM. Yet there he was in December, onstage at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (as his new wife, the pop singer Katy Perry, waited backstage), describing how TM has helped him repair his psychic wounds.

“Transcendental Meditation has been incredibly valuable to me both in my recovery as a drug addict and in my personal life, my marriage, my professional life,” Mr. Brand said of the technique that prescribes two 15- to 20-minute sessions a day of silently repeating a one-to-three syllable mantra, so that practitioners can access a state of what is known as transcendental consciousness. “I literally had an idea drop into my brain the other day while I was meditating which I think is worth millions of dollars.”

Mr. Brand was the M.C. at a benefit for the David Lynch Foundation, an organization that offers TM at no cost to troubled students, veterans, homeless people, prisoners and others. Like many other guests in the room, Mr. Brand has been personally counseled by Mr. Lynch, the enigmatic film director, who has been a devout practitioner of TM, founded in 1958 by the spiritual leader Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, since its first wave of popularity in the late ’60s. That is when Mia Farrow, after her divorce from Frank Sinatra, joined the Beatles in the Maharishi’s ashram in Rishikesh, India; when George Lucas started meditating and was rumored to have based the Yoda character in “Star Wars” on the Maharishi (the resemblance is eerie); and when the talk show host Merv Griffin, after being introduced to the technique by his tennis buddy, the actor Clint Eastwood, invited the Maharishi to be on his show in 1975.

Since then, the celebrity endorsement, and therefore the enrollment numbers, had quieted down. That is, until the last three years when, according to the national Transcendental Meditation program, enrollment tripled.

At Trinity College in Hartford, the women’s squash league began meditating together after every practice last year. The Doe Fund, an organization that assists the homeless, has begun offering TM to its residents along with computer skills and job training. And Ray Dalio, the billionaire hedge-fund manager of Bridgewater, has long credited the success of his funds to his daily practice.

The Transcendental Meditation program attributes the spike to a series of recent studies that suggest TM can help reduce blood pressure and stress, and to the relatively recent affordability of TM. (The adult course, which had ballooned from $75 in the ’60s to $2,500 in 2007, dropped, because of the economy, to $1,500 in 2008.) No less important has been Mr. Lynch’s foundation, started in 2005, for which enlisted celebrities like Mr. Brand, interrogated often by news outlets about their diets and alternative lifestyle remedies, have been preaching about the technique.

“It’s like, imagine the ripples on top of an ocean,” Dr. Mehmet Oz, who meditates in an armchair in an enclave off his bedroom, said at Mr. Lynch’s benefit. “And I’m in a rowboat, reactively dealing with the waves and water coming into my boat. What I need to do is dive into the deeper solace, the calmness beneath the surface.”

The actress Susan Sarandon meditates once a day for 20 minutes in bed. “It helps me chill out and focus,” she said. (Ms. Sarandon said she doesn’t practice TM specifically, but was at the benefit to gather insight.)

The singer Moby, another guest, has meditated in the back of a taxicab. “Transcendental Meditation has given me a perspective on agitation,” he said. “That it’s a temporary state of mind and I don’t necessarily need to take it that seriously.” Moby said the technique helped him quit drinking more than a year ago. “I used to think that TM was for weird old hippies,” he added. “But then I heard that David Lynch was involved, and that made me curious.”

ON the afternoon before the benefit, Mr. Lynch, 65, arrived at the museum, holding hands with his wife, Emily Lynch, 32, and was escorted by a museum employee to a green room downstairs. Mr. Lynch, like a cartoon character, has maintained the same uniform for decades: a pressed white shirt under a boxy black suit and a hedge of gray hair. He scooped up a soggy egg-salad sandwich from a tray and explained what brought him to the practice.

“I was not into meditation one bit,” Mr. Lynch said, in his laconic Missoula, Mont., drawl that years of living in Los Angeles has failed to dilute. “I thought it was a fad. I thought you had to eat nuts and raisins, and I didn’t want any part of it.”

Mr. Lynch was persuaded by his sister, Martha, when he began having marital difficulties with the first of his four wives, Peggy, in the early ’70s. “I had a whole bunch of personal anger that I would take out on her,” he said. “I think I was a weak person. I wasn’t self-assured. I was not a happy camper inside. Two weeks after I started, my wife comes to me and says, ‘This anger, where did it go?’ I felt a freedom and happiness growing inside. It was like — poooft! — I felt a kind of smile from Mother Nature. The world looked better and better. It’s an ocean of unbounded love within us, so it’s real hard to get a conflict going.” (Still, a year later, the couple divorced.)

It’s easy to shrug off such utterances as hokey, New Age prattle — who can forget Jeff Goldblum’s flaky character in “Annie Hall” on the phone, complaining that he’d forgotten his mantra? — but less so when the person reciting it has dreamed up his most widely admired, vivid films on the days when he was dropping out of consciousness for at least 30 minutes a day.

“Artists like to say, ‘I like a little bit of suffering and anger,’ ” he said. “But if you had a splitting headache, diarrhea and vomiting, how much would you enjoy the work and how much work would you get done? Maybe suffering is a romantic idea to get girls, but it’s an enemy to creativity.”

A version of this article appeared in print on March 20, 2011, on page ST1 of the New York edition. It was also published Saturday, March 26, 2011, in the TheLedger.com: Transcendental Meditation: Celebrities, Recent Biological Studies Increase Interest in Discipline

Watch David Lynch Foundation Press Conference and the Change Begins Within Benefit Celebration

December 14, 2010

Watch livestream rebroadcasts of two extraordinary events: the David Lynch Foundation Press Conference to launch Operation Warrior Wellness, from the Paley Center for Media, and the Change Begins Within Gala Event at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, Monday, December 13, 2010. See David Lynch Foundation’s Photos – Change Begins Within and Broadway World photo coverage of the 2nd Annual David Lynch Foundation’s Change Begins Within Benefit Celebration. Watch highlights of both events: the press conference and the second annual benefit gala.

The Huffington Post: Jeanne Ball: David Lynch Talks About the Benefits of Meditation

December 13, 2010
Writer for the David Lynch Foundation,
Meditation Teacher for 25 Years
Posted: December 13, 2010 05:49 PM

David Lynch Talks About the Benefits of Meditation

“Change Begins Within,” a benefit event featuring David Lynch, Clint Eastwood, Russell Brand, Katy Perry, Dr. Mehmet Oz and Candy Crowley, takes place tonight, Dec. 13 at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. You can watch it LIVE beginning at 9 p.m. EST.

We know David Lynch for his award-winning films — “Mulholland Drive” was recently voted movie of the decade by the LA Film Critics Association. Seems like every night there’s a “Twin Peaks” party going on somewhere. Lynch is also known as an artist, musician, philanthropist and proponent of meditation. He has been meditating twice a day for 37 years. His interests in meditation have led him to India and the Far East, as well as university EEG labs where brain researchers are exploring meditation’s effects on the brain.

I caught up with him amid his preparations for the David Lynch Foundation‘s upcoming benefit, happening tonight, to provide meditation training to 10,000 veterans with PTSD.

Click here to read the interview.

WATCH David Lynch speak about consciousness and creativity:


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