Archive for October, 2009

Breast Cancer Patients Reduce Stress With Transcendental Meditation

October 18, 2009

NewsBlazeBreaking News

Published: October 18,2009

Breast Cancer Patients Reduce Stress With Transcendental Meditation

By Deborah Mitchell for the Phoenix Alternative Medicine Examiner

A new study published in the September issue of Integrative Cancer Therapies reports that women who have breast cancer can reduce their stress and improve their emotional and mental well-being by practicing the Transcendental Meditation technique.

According to the American Cancer Society, the National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine reports that regular meditation can reduce chronic pain, high blood pressure, anxiety, and blood levels of cortisol, one of the stress hormones.

Transcendental Meditation study
The Transcendental Meditation study involved 130 women aged 55 years or older who had breast cancer. The two-year study was a collaboration between the Center for Healthy Aging at Saint Joseph Hospital, Northwestern University, Indiana State University, and the Institute for Natural Medicine and Prevention at Maharishi University of Management.

The women were randomly assigned to practice the Transcendental Meditation technique or to a group of usual care (control group). All the women were administered quality of life measures every six months for two years. The women who practiced Transcendental Meditation reported significant benefits in their overall quality of life and found that the meditation was easy to practice at home.

Meditation, stress, and breast cancer
Research shows that stress and anxiety are contributing factors in the onset and progression of breast cancer and mortality, according to Sanford Nidich, the study’s lead author and a senior researcher at the Institute for Natural Medicine and Prevention at Maharishi University of Management.

A study recently completed by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston reported that meditation programs are effective at reducing cognitive impairment associated with cancer, as well as stress, fatigue, nausea, pain, and sleep problems. The authors proposed that meditation should be investigated as an adjuvant to cancer treatment.

In the Phoenix area, the Maharishi Enlightenment Center of Phoenix offers introductory lectures on Transcendental Meditation every week. Reservations are required.

Every War Has Two Losers, a Haydn Reiss film on poet and conscientious objector William Stafford

October 18, 2009

EVERY WAR HAS TWO LOSERS

A Poet’s Meditation on Peace

A FILM BASED ON THE JOURNALS OF WILLIAM STAFFORD

Haydn Reiss (producer/director) has been making independent films for twenty years that often focus on writers and poets. As a producer for hire his clients include organizations working on the front lines of education, the environment, culture, human rights, politics and health. In 1998, Reiss directed the award-winning RUMI: Poet of the Heart, which was seen on over 100 PBS stations and screened in festivals around the world.

EVERY WAR HAS TWO LOSERS tells the story of how one man, William Stafford (1914-1993), chose to answer the call to war. It is a story of confronting beliefs that swirl around war — Isn’t war inevitable? Even necessary? What about the enemy? Stafford refused to fight in World War Two and served four years in camps for conscientious objectors. Later he was the winner of the National Book Award for poetry.

Other participants appearing in the film include Coleman Barks, Robert Bly, John Gorka, Maxine Hong Kingston, Michael Meade, W.S. Merwin, Naomi Shihab Nye, Kim Stafford, and Alice Walker.

Director Haydn Reiss first met Stafford in 1990 and later produced a one-hour documentary, William Stafford & Robert Bly: A Literary Friendship. That film chronicles the similarities and differences between these two close friends and great poets. Approaches to writing, teaching and the meaning of poetry are all explored in this lively and engaging film. (The film is included as a DVD extra on EVERY WAR HAS TWO LOSERS)

Interview with Haydn Reiss:

Q: What’s the genesis of the film?

HR: In 2006, I read the book the film is based on and that was edited by his son Kim, “Every War Has Two Losers: William Stafford on Peace & War” (Milkweed Editions 2004). It’s fifty years of excerpts from Bill’s journals related to war and reconciliation. As with all of Stafford’s writings, there is a sense of a deep intelligence at work that stays human and available to the reader. There’s humor, heartbreak and a general sense, or assertion, that we human beings are capable of doing better with each other. I’m a father of young children and I have to believe that’s true. More importantly, I had to try and make a contribution to that effort and that’s what I attempted with the film.

Q: How does the book differ from the film?

HR: Obviously there’s a lot more writing and poems in the book than the film. The challenge was to pull journal entries that could be arranged in some form or fashion and create an overall arc to the film. A beginning, middle and end has not been much improved upon in the world of storytelling. All the material could be endlessly mixed since there was no inherent order to it other than chronological. So mix it we did some untold number of times until the cylinders seemed to line up and my editor and I had something we liked. The film brings in its own ingredients of music, images and a remarkable collection of participants.

Q: What do you hope the film does for the viewer?

HR: It would be very satisfying to think that after viewing the film you would ask yourself, at a deep level, what you really believe about war. And the follow-up question of “How did I come to believe that?” I think we have been very successfully indoctrinated into accepting that war is a given, it’s what human beings do. The distinction is, and I think this is what Stafford is saying, is “Yes, we do and can make war. But what else can we do?” The undiscovered possibilities in human behavior are what we should pursue. The die is not cast; imagination and creativity are not in short supply. That this is the real, pragmatic work of the world.

View trailer, download PBS station airings August-September 2010, bios, and purchase a DVD of Every War Has Two Losers.

Also see PEACEFUL POETS: Filmmaker Haydn Reiss on Rumi and Stafford and the Power of Words and A Fascinating Approach to Peace.

Alternative to ADHD Drugs

October 16, 2009

care2

Alternative to ADHD Drugs

 

posted by Mel, selected from Natural Solutions magazine Oct 15, 2009

care2photo

By Diana Reynolds Roome, Natural Solutions

Josh Goulding was diagnosed with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in second grade, after his impulsive and disruptive behavior frequently landed him in the school principal’s office. “Over several years, I was put on a whole gamut of drugs, and nothing worked well,” says Goulding, now 24. By his second year at Georgetown University in Washington, DC, Goulding was still struggling to concentrate in classes and complete his work, and his medications were causing mood swings and irritability.

The Conventional Rx: Stimulant drugs, such as Ritalin and Adderall. Almost 4.5 million children between ages 4 and 17 are diagnosed with ADHD, and nearly half of them take prescription medications, often for years. Long term, these drugs may be physically and psychologically harmful, and side effects such as sleep disturbances, poor appetite, weight loss, and mood disorders can require further medication.

The Alternative Rx: Transcendental Meditation (TM). In the first study on ADHD and TM, middle-school-age children who did twice daily nonreligious meditations for 10 minutes reduced their stress levels by over 50 percent–resulting in fewer ADHD symptoms. “TM helps children focus on a special mantra or sound, which helps the child transcend mental busyness and stress,” says Sarina Grosswald, EdD, coauthor of the study. “This allows the child’s body to completely relax and his mind to stay fully awake without effort. The results are improved behavior, grades, creativity, and inner stability.”

The Outcome: Just before turning 21, Goulding attended a talk on TM and signed up to learn the technique. First, he started sleeping better. Then, finding it easier to focus and relate to others, his grades improved. When Goulding returned to his doctor, his blood pressure was lower (it had been borderline hypertensive before he started TM) and, even after he stopped taking ADHD medications, his grade-point average continued to rise.

http://www.care2.com/greenliving/alternative-to-adhd-drugs.html

For more details on TM & ADHD visit: http://www.adhd-tm.org/

Asian Tribune: Give India the Best Defence System in the World

October 13, 2009

Asian Tribune logo

Give India the Best Defence System in the World
Tue, 2009-10-13 23:39 — editor

By Dr. John Hagelin and Dr. David Leffler

US President Barack Obama won the prestigious Nobel Peace Prize this year just two weeks after shepherding a resolution through the 15-member UN Security Council calling upon all countries, including India, to participate in the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT).

The reduction or elimination of nuclear weapons is clearly an important goal. But how can this goal be achieved in today’s hate-filled, high-tension political climate? Both India and Pakistan have acquired their nuclear weapons as protection or deterrence against attack.

The word “deterrence” comes from the Latin root meaning “fear.” In theory, war is deterred by instilling fear in potential enemies, and to this end, India has amassed tremendous destructive potential. But this same fear incites other countries to acquire their own nuclear arsenals, further inflaming regional tensions and hatred. For this reason, no country committed to defence solely through destructive power is likely to generate a trust-based, peaceful atmosphere.

Diplomacy and economic sanctions likewise have not been sufficient to resolve the fear crisis-which is driven by human behavioral dynamics that cannot be controlled by such methods alone.

War and conflict are human problems requiring human solutions. The underlying cause of conflict is accumulated social stress. Today the military of India has an opportunity to address this fundamental cause of war by deploying a new, scientifically verified technology of defence beyond nuclear weapons.

A New Solution

This new technology of defence is based upon the latest discoveries in the fields of physics, neuroscience, and physiology. Ultimately, it is based on the discovery of the unified field of all the laws of nature-the most fundamental and powerful level of nature’s dynamics. Technologies based upon this unified field of natural law have such concentrated power that they can render obsolete and irrelevant every previous objective technology and destructive means of defence.

Modern science has probed deeper levels of nature’s functioning, from the macroscopic world of classical physics to the underlying atomic, nuclear, and subnuclear levels, culminating in the discovery of the unified field, the unified source of the diversified laws of nature governing the universe. Because this unified field is vastly more powerful than any other level of nature’s dynamics, a technology of defence based upon the unified field is of historic importance. It is already changing the whole science and technology of defence.

Accessing the Unified Field Within

Since the unified field is the source of the objective world, its power cannot be harnessed through objective technologies. A new approach is needed-one that draws upon the world’s subjective traditions of meditation. Properly understood and property practiced, meditation throughout the ages has been a systematic technology to turn human awareness within to experience finer levels of thought, deeper levels of human intelligence that correspond to deeper levels of intelligence in nature. This inward exploration culminates in direct experience of the deepest level of consciousness-the simplest, silent, settled state of human awareness, sometimes called the state of pure consciousness-in which the human mind identifies with the unified field. By turning the attention systematically within, human awareness explores deeper levels of nature’s functioning and ultimately experiences the unified field at the source of thought-the field of unity at the basis of mind and matter.

The Vedic tradition of knowledge from India is the most complete and highly developed tradition of meditation in the world, yet this ancient approach of gaining knowledge and experience of the unified field has become the focus of intense scientific research over the past 50 years. The late Maharishi Mahesh Yogi revived, from the ancient Vedic science of consciousness, systematic technologies for experiencing the unified field, including the Transcendental Meditation program and its advanced techniques. These meditation practices are known as Invincible Defence Technology (IDT) in military circles and have been successfully applied by members of many faiths to eliminate conflict in the recent past. If the military of India were to apply this human resource-based technology, which is non-lethal and non-destructive, it could reduce the collective societal stress that is fueling the rising tensions between India and Pakistan.

The Prevention Wings

A Prevention Wing of the Military would be the ideal way to achieve this goal. Less than 1% of the military of India would participate in this wing. The remaining personnel would carry out their normal military duties. The Prevention Wing would be trained in the primary components of IDT. They would practice these technologies in large groups, morning and evening.

The Maharishi Effect

Over 50 research studies confirm that when the required threshold of IDT experts is crossed-approximately the square root of 1% of the size of a given population-crime goes down in the affected population, quality of life indices go up, and war and terrorism abate. Scientists have named this phenomenon the Maharishi Effect in honor of Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, who first predicted it. The causal mechanism appears to be a field effect of consciousness-a spillover effect on the level of the unified field from the peace-creating group into the larger population.

For instance, in 1993, a two-month Maharishi Effect intervention was implemented and studied in Washington, DC. Predictions of specific drops in crime and other indices were lodged in advance with government leaders and newspapers. The research protocol was approved by an independent Project Review Board. The findings showed that crime fell 23.3 percent below the predicted level when the peace-creating group reached its maximum size. Temperature, weekend effects, or previous trends in the data failed to account for changes. This research was published in the peer-reviewed Social Indicators Research (1999, vol. 47, 153-201).

The Maharishi Effect was documented on a global scale in a study using Rand Corporation data and published in the Journal of Offender Rehabilitation (2003, vol. 36, 283-302). When assemblies of IDT experts exceeded the Maharishi Effect threshold for the world (about 7,000 at that time) during the years 1983-1985, terrorism globally decreased 72%, international conflict decreased 32%, and violence in nations was reduced without intrusion by other governments.

The Opportunity for Permanent Peace

The military of India is charged with the constitutional responsibility to defend the country. It can now succeed in this mission simply by creating a Prevention Wing of the Military – a coherence-creating group of IDT experts exceeding the square root of 1% of the population of India – approximately 3,415 soldiers.

As part of its responsibility to protect the nation, India’s military is obligated to thoroughly examine realistic, scientifically proven methods for preventing war and terrorism. IDT is such a method. Moreover, since the military and military personnel are funded by the government, a Prevention Wing of the Military would not be subject to the fluctuations in size that often affect civilian IDT groups, where participation may be influenced by finances, job demands, graduations, and optional activities.

All areas of society will be simultaneously enriched by this holistically life-supporting, life-benefiting technology. It is enormously effective and cost-effective, and the results are immediate. All that is necessary is to provide the proper training for a group of military personnel-or indeed, any large group within the country. India has the opportunity today through IDT to create national security, invincibility, and peace. But the time to act is now.

About the Authors:

Dr. John Hagelin is the Director of the Institute of Science, Technology and Public Policy (ISTPP), an organization in the United States that advocates scientifically proven, prevention-oriented solutions to critical global problems. He is a Harvard-trained quantum physicist who won the prestigious Kilby Award, which recognizes scientists who have made “major contributions to society through their applied research in the fields of science and technology.” Dr. Hagelin also serves as the Executive Director of the International Center for Invincible Defense and as International Director of the Global Union of Scientists for Peace. A video of Dr. Hagelin (1:13:00) explaining the scientific research on IDT is available online as well as from a transcription with full-sized images from his presentation.

David Leffler, Ph.D. a United States Air Force veteran, is the Executive Director of the Center for Advanced Military Science (CAMS) at ISTPP. Dr. Leffler received his Ph.D. from The Union Institute & University in Cincinnati, Ohio where he did his doctoral research on the topic of IDT. His other academic degrees include: a B.A. in Education and an M.A. in the Science of Creative Intelligence from Maharishi University of Management in Fairfield, Iowa and an M.M. in Education from New Mexico State

– Asian Tribune –

http://bit.ly/LxRLN

Transcendental Meditation reduces stress, improves mental health among women with breast cancer

October 13, 2009

[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 13-Oct-2009

Transcendental Meditation reduces stress, improves mental health among women with breast cancer

Chicago, Ill. (October 13, 2009) – Women with breast cancer reduced stress and improved their mental health and emotional well being through the Transcendental Meditation technique, according to a new study published in the current issue of the peer-reviewed Integrative Cancer Therapies (Vol. 8, No. 3: September 2009).

“A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Effects of Transcendental Meditation on Quality of Life in Older Breast Cancer Patients” was a collaboration between the Center for Healthy Aging at Saint Joseph Hospital; the Institute for Health Services, Research and Policy Studies at Northwestern University; the Department of Psychology at Indiana State University; and the Institute for Natural Medicine and Prevention at Maharishi University of Management.

“It is wonderful that physicians now have a range of interventions to use, including Transcendental Meditation, to benefit their patients with cancer,” said Rhoda Pomerantz, M.D., study co-author and chief of gerontology, Saint Joseph Hospital. “I believe this approach should be appreciated and utilized more widely.”

One hundred thirty women with breast cancer, 55 years and older, participated in the two-year study at Saint Joseph Hospital. The women were randomly assigned to either the Transcendental Meditation technique or to a usual care control group. Patients were administered quality of life measures, including the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast (FACT-B), every six months for two years. The average intervention period was 18 months.

Stress contributes to the onset and progression of breast cancer

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women—striking about 13% of women. Women over the age of 50 have four times the incidence of breast cancer compared to women below 50. Breast cancer remains a leading cause of death among women, according to the National Cancer Institute.

“Emotional and psychosocial stress contribute to the onset and progression of breast cancer and cancer mortality,” said Sanford Nidich, lead author of the study and senior researcher at the Institute for Natural Medicine and Prevention at Maharishi University of Management.

“The Transcendental Meditation technique reduces stress and improves emotional well-being and mental health in older breast cancer patients. The women in the study found their meditation practice easy to do at home and reported significant benefits in their overall quality of life,” Dr. Nidich said.

“Decades of research have shown that stress contributes to the cause and complications of cancer,” said Robert Schneider, M.D., F.A.C.C., co-author and director of Institute for Natural Medicine and Prevention at Maharishi University of Management. “The data from this well-designed clinical trial and related studies suggest that effective stress reduction with the Transcendental Meditation program may be useful in the prevention and treatment and of breast cancer and its deleterious consequences.”

###

Maharishi University of Management

The study was supported by grants from the Retirement Research Foundation of Chicago and the National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

Facts on Breast Cancer

  • Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women—and remains a leading cause of death.
  • Breast cancer incidence in the United States is 1 in 8 (about 13%).
  • In 2008, an estimated 250,000 new cases of breast cancer were diagnosed in women in the U.S.
  • Women above the age of 50 have nearly four times the incidence compared to women under 50
  • Newly diagnosed and long-term survivors are affected by impairment in quality of life (QOL), including emotional, physical, functional, social, and spiritual domains.
  • Psychosocial stress contributes to the onset, progression, and mortality from this disease.
  • Clinical diagnosis of breast cancer increases psychological distress, with sustained distress occurring during cancer treatment and continuing long-term.
  • There have been an increasing number of women using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for female-specific cancers. In terms of breast cancer, recent studies indicate that CAM use among women may be as high as 90 percent.

About Saint Joseph Hospital:

Founded in 1868, Saint Joseph Hospital has a long tradition of providing care to the community. The 335-bed full-service hospital on Chicago’s north side specializes in a full array of services, including cardiology, cancer, orthopedics, family medicine, diabetes and behavioral care. The hospital has more than 550 physicians on staff, representing more than 35 specialties. As a community-based teaching facility, Saint Joseph has six residency programs. Saint Joseph Hospital is a part of Resurrection Health Care.

In 2009, the hospital received for the sixth year in a row the Stroke Care HealthGrades Specialty Excellence Award, ranking it among the top 5 percent of U.S. hospitals for stroke care. The hospital is also a Blue Distinction Center for Cardiac Care® and is five-star rated in six clinical areas, including cholecystectomy (gall bladder removal), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (lung disease), heart failure, hip fracture repair, pneumonia and treatment of stroke. The Center for Cancer Care of Saint Joseph Hospital was recently designated the first accredited breast center in Chicago by the American College of Surgeons (ACoS) National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), one of only three in Illinois. For information, visit sjh.reshealth.org/proven.

Contact: Susan E. White
Susan.White2@reshealthcare.org
773-665-3445
Saint Joseph Hospital

http://bit.ly/1ffiTi

Egrets Painting and Poem

October 10, 2009

Egrets in Morning Light by Australian artist Gareth Jones–Roberts*

Translated

on the edge of space
two egrets in morning light
woken from a dream

—haiku by Ken Chawkin
Spring, 2001, Melbourne, Australia

*Photo of painting used by permission from the artist (1935–2013)
(Click painting to enlarge it.)

During a 3-month stay in Melbourne, Australia, I was fortunate to have met the artist through a mutual friend, his physician, and mine at the time, Dr. Graham Brown. Gareth’s painting was hanging on Graham’s office wall. I asked him who the artist was and he told me it was one of his patients. He gave it to him in exchange for learning Transcendental Meditation. Graham was also a TM Teacher. I was so taken by the painting that I wrote this haiku and shared it with him. One day, Graham asked me if I would like to come along to visit Gareth and share the haiku with him. I jumped at the chance and met Gareth, his wife and their son. Lovely people! He showed me around his studio and I shared the haiku with him. He liked it very much. I shared more poems with him. We hit it off and we stayed in touch over the years. He was a special soul!

This poem was published in two poetry books: The Dryland Fish, An Anthology of Contemporary Iowa Poets (2003), contained in 13 Ways to Write Haiku: A Poet’s Dozen; and in This Enduring Gift — A Flowering of Fairfield Poetry (2010), included in Five Haiku.

Record of the Day: BMI named Donovan a BMI Icon

October 8, 2009

Record of the Day

BMI Award winners
2009-10-07

American music rights organization Broadcast Music, Inc. (BMI) lauded the UK and Europe’s premier songwriters, composers and music publishers tonight during its annual BMI London Awards. The ceremony was hosted by BMI President & CEO Del Bryant; BMI Senior Vice President, Writer/Publisher Relations Phil Graham; and Executive Director, Writer/Publisher Relations, Europe & Asia Brandon Bakshi. Staged in London’s Dorchester Hotel, Park Lane, the event honored the past year’s most-performed songs on U.S. radio and television. BMI is a United States-based performing right organization that collects and distributes monies for the public performance of music on outlets including radio, television, the Internet and the top-grossing tours in the U.S. British citizens honored at the event are members of the UK performing right society PRS for Music (PRS) and are represented in the US by BMI.
In addition to saluting numerous UK songwriters, composers and music publishers alongside music creators from Europe, India and other international markets, BMI named Donovan a BMI Icon. The Icon designation is given to BMI songwriters who have bestowed “a unique and indelible influence on generations of music makers.” Donovan joins an elite list of past honorees that includes multi-genre nobility Bryan Ferry, Peter Gabriel, Ray Davies, Van Morrison, the Bee Gees, Isaac Hayes, Dolly Parton, James Brown, Willie Nelson, Paul Simon, Steve Winwood and more.
Donovan transformed popular music in the 1960s, earning 12 consecutive Top 40 hits, including “Mellow Yellow,” “Sunshine Superman,” “Wear Your Love Like Heaven,” “There Is a Mountain,” “Lalena,” “Epistle to Dippy,” “Atlantis,” “Hurdy Gurdy Man,” and “Jennifer Juniper,” all of which he wrote alone. His compositions have also resurfaced in hit films and television series, as well as various advertising campaigns. In 1965, “Catch the Wind” earned an Ivor Novello Award for best contemporary folk song, marking the first time the honor was bestowed on an artist’s debut single. Donovan received an Honorary Doctor of Letters from the University of Hertfordshire in 2003, and in 2009, he became Officer of the Order of Arts and Letters from the Minister of Culture, France, and garnered the American Visionary Art Museum Baltimore’s prestigious Grand Visionary Award. A man not only of unfathomable talent but of rare conviction as well, he is a well-known proponent and student of Transcendental Meditation and leads the musical wing of the David Lynch Foundation for Consciousness-Based Education and World Peace. Hard at work on a new album entitled Ritual Groove, Donovan plans to tour continuously through 2010.

Read about the other BMI Award winners in the complete article here: http://bit.ly/uK5DQ

Donovan to be Named Icon at BMI London Awards

October 4, 2009

Donovan to be Named Icon at BMI London Awards

Donovan.BMI.IconLONDON: Donovan will be named a BMI Icon at the U.S. performing right organization’s annual London Awards, slated for Tuesday, October 6 at London’s Dorchester Hotel, Park Lane. The invitation-only gala will recognize the U.K. and European songwriters and publishers of the past year’s most-played BMI songs on American radio and television. Broadcast Music Inc. (BMI) is a United States-based performing right organization that collects and distributes monies for the public performance of music on outlets including radio, television, the Internet and the top-grossing tours in the U.S.

The Icon designation is given to BMI songwriters who have bestowed “a unique and indelible influence on generations of music makers.” Donovan joins an elite list of past honorees that includes multi-genre nobility Bryan Ferry, Peter Gabriel, Ray Davies, Van Morrison, the Bee Gees, Isaac Hayes, Dolly Parton, James Brown, Willie Nelson, Hall & Oates, Paul Simon, Crosby, Stills & Nash, Steve Winwood and more.

Donovan is a master of poignant simplicity. Capable of evoking passionate idealism and freewheeling emotion in a single word or chord, he transformed popular music in the 1960s and went on to build a legendary career. Already a folk hero in the early 60s thanks to hits including “Catch the Wind” and “Colours,” Donovan proceeded to generate considerable radio success for the rest of the decade with 11 consecutive Top 40 hits, including “Mellow Yellow,” “Sunshine Superman,” “Wear Your Love Like Heaven,” “There Is a Mountain,” “Lalena,” “Epistle to Dippy,” “Atlantis,” “Hurdy Gurdy Man,” and “Jennifer Juniper,” all of which he wrote alone. While “Jennifer Juniper” has generated more than 1 million performances, “Mellow Yellow” has earned more than 2 million and ““Sunshine Superman” has garnered almost 3 million performances. His compositions have also resurfaced in hit films and television series including Goodfellas, Election, Dumb and Dumber, Rushmore, The Simpsons, Nip/Tuck, Ugly Betty, Clueless, Boys on the Side, Murphy Brown, My Name is Earl and Dancing with the Stars.

Donovan was profoundly influential on the Beatles, becoming one of an elite handful of artists who collaborated on songs with the band. In 1965, “Catch the Wind” earned an Ivor Novello Award for best contemporary folk song, marking the first time the honor was bestowed on an artist’s debut single. Donovan received an Honorary Doctor of Letters from University of Hertfordshire in 2003, and in 2009, he became Officer of the Order of Arts and Letters from the French Republic and garnered the American Visionary Art Museum Baltimore’s prestigious Grand Visionary Award.

A man not only of unfathomable talent but of rare conviction as well, he is a well-known proponent and student of Transcendental Meditation and leads the musical wing of the David Lynch Foundation for Consciousness-Based Education and World Peace. In the past three years, Donovan has traveled with David Lynch throughout the United States, the UK, and Brazil, performing his hit songs and speaking on the benefits of meditation.

The David Lynch Foundation has now provided scholarships for more than 100,000 at-risk youth worldwide to learn to meditate. http://www.davidlynchfoundation.org

Hard at work on a new album entitled Ritual Groove, Donovan plans to tour continuously through 2010.

While BMI collects royalties for him in the United States, Donovan is a member of British performing right society PRS for Music.

Hosted by BMI President & CEO Del Bryant; BMI Senior Vice President, Writer/Publisher Relations Phil Graham; and Executive Director, Writer/Publisher Relations, Europe & Asia Brandon Bakshi, the BMI London Awards will also present the Robert S. Musel Award to the writer and publisher of the most performed song of the year. BMI will also bestow “Million-Air” certificates on writers and publishers whose songs have achieved more than three million U.S. radio and television performances — the equivalent of more than 17 years of continuous airplay.

Broadcast Music, Inc.® (BMI) is an American performing right organization that represents more than 375,000 songwriters, composers and music publishers in all genres of music and more than 6.5 million works. BMI reported $901 million for its 2008 fiscal year in performing right collections. BMI has represented the most popular and beloved music from around the world for 70 years. The U.S. corporation collects license fees from businesses that use music, which it then distributes as royalties to the musical creators and copyright owners it represents.

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Contacts:

USA – Hanna Pantle, BMI

310-289-6328; hpantle@bmi.com

UK – Kate Etteridge, LD Communications

44-(0)20-7439-7222; kate.etteridge@ldcommunications.co.uk

Photo credit: Stuart Steele

John Hagelin, Ph.D., Speaks on the Nature of Consciousness and the Universe

October 3, 2009

John_Hagelin_Ph.D.

Will Arntz, director of What the Bleep Do We Know?!, asks John Hagelin, Ph.D., about the nature of consciousness. Dr. Hagelin explains the unity underlying and giving rise to the diversity of creation, and the deepest unified level of human consciousness, as being one and the same. This 2-part interview is available on empowured.com along with other related videos: Unified Field Physics: John Hagelin, Ph.D on Consciousness.

Other videos worth watching: Conscious TV: John Hagelin – The Core of Nature | Dr. John Hagelin: Look Within to Understand the Universe | John Hagelin — “Only Higher Consciousness Can Transform Our World” — Beyond Awakening Blog | John Hagelin at TEDxWomen 2012 – YouTube | The Power of The Collective, by John Hagelin

Quad-Cities Online: Dispatch•Argus

October 2, 2009
Quad-Cities Online Mast

Posted Online: Oct 01, 2009 09:56PM

Moline grad nabs National High School Coach of the Year

By Ryan Sergeant, rsergeant@qconline.com

Coach_EyrePrestigious awards have been stacking up on Lawrence Eyre’s trophy case since he began playing the game of tennis back in the 1960s.

Now comes a big one — the 1966 Moline High School graduate has been named 2009’s National High School Coach of the Year at the World Conference of the United States Professional Tennis Association, the world’s largest association of tennis-teaching professionals.

Eyre now is coaching at Maharishi School in Fairfield, Iowa, which he has been doing since 1988 when he started the tennis program. However, playing and coaching all began for Eyre in Moline over 40 years ago.

He even joked about how long ago it has been since he walked the halls of Moline High School, noting that it was even before legendary Moline coach Tom Derouin took over the helm at MHS in 1968.

“So, it was really definite ancient history,” Eyre joked, also noting that he and Derouin are friends and work together as umpires in various Big Ten tennis events.

He can remember his first influence in the game of tennis being his high school coach, Joe Ruberg, who recently just passed away. Ruberg was the swimming coach at MHS and even though he didn’t teach the technical side of tennis, he kept the boys fit.

“He was the first one to admit that tennis was not his primary sport, but he got us fit,” he said. “He told me he wanted me to watch (pro) Rod Laver and I did every chance I had. (Ruberg) gave me tennis magazines; he was as encouraging as could be.

“It broke my heart I could not thank him,” Eyre said of his coach, learning of his passing after he received the honor. “I wanted to pay tribute to him; I thank him very much for all of his encouragement.”

Shortly after graduation from Moline High, mothers of younger tennis players came to Eyre and some of his high school teammates and asked if he was interested in teaching tennis lessons. At the time, there were no outlets in the Quad-Cities for tennis lessons and Eyre was thrilled to jump at the opportunity.

But what he didn’t know is what it would turn out to be today. That represented the start of the Moline Park Board program, which has advanced past just tennis, with football and basketball opportunities for young kids.

“Ten teachers went to all these different parks and taught over 500 kids for an eight-week summer session,” he said. “A whole pile of those kids went on to play college tennis or teaching professionals. It’s real gratifying, and it really was a lot of fun.”

Eyre was just a normal kid growing up, enjoying all different kinds of sports like all of his peers. Tennis was not one of them, and it wasn’t until 1961 when the influence of his grandmother really turned him on to the sport.

“She gave me a picture of the king of England playing tennis,” he said. “You see, my dad was an all-state football player at Moline, but he had become disabled after his time in the Marines because of a football injury. My grandma took it upon herself; she was lobbying to get me to play a sport where I was less likely to get injured.”

It was a decision that he still thanks his grandmother to this day. And it’s one that now has national award implications.


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