Posts Tagged ‘The Hawk Eye’

The Hawk Eye interviewed Fairfield native Cameron Mullenneaux on her Emmy nomination, competing against news giants ABC and CBS

September 18, 2018

The 70th Primetime Emmy Awards, honoring the best and brightest in the world of television, was held Monday night at the Microsoft Theater at L.A. Live in Los Angeles. The 39th Annual News and Documentary Emmy® Awards will be held Monday, October 1, in a ceremony at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall in the Time Warner Complex at Columbus Circle in New York City. The event will be attended by more than 1,000 television and news media industry executives, news and documentary producers and journalists.

A short film directed and produced by Fairfield native Cameron Mullenneaux will be in the running. Condé Nast Inc. funded “Angelique” for Glamour Magazine, posted it online last November, and submitted it to The National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (NATAS) for an Outstanding Feature Story in a News Magazine. Angelique’s story, the adversities she had to overcome, and the way Cameron captured it is truly inspirational. The film will be competing against ABC’s 20/20 and CBS’s 60 Minutes!!

Bob Saar interviewed Cameron on her nomination and filed this report for The Hawk Eye’s Sunday edition: Fairfield native pitted against CBS, ABC.

The entertainment business is rarely looked upon by Americans as “business” because they’re attracted to the Hollywood glamour and gossip.

You might hear some guy say, “Those guys are artists, not businessmen.”

Two problems here: They aren’t all guys, guys. And those who succeed are, indeed, business-men or -women.

Southeast Iowa filmmaker Cameron Mullenneaux is an artist and businesswoman, and this week, she’s in New York at the Emmy awards. Director-producer Mullenneaux is up for an Emmy against giants ABC and CBS — and their big guns Diane Sawyer and Leslie Stahl.

Cameron Mulleanneaux

Cameron Mullenneaux, producer/director of “Angelique”, is competing against news giants ABC’s 20/20 and NBC’s 60 Minutes for an Emmy for Outstanding Feature Story in a News Magazine.

Mullenneaux, formerly Bargerstock — she married in June — is a Fairfield native, the daughter of Betty and Andy Bargerstock, a professor at Maharishi University of Management. Mullenneaux, who now lives in California, wrote, produced and directed “Angelique,” a film about a straight-A homeless high school student in Asheville, North Carolina.

“I was looking for a bright, creative, and resilient young person who didn’t let their difficult life circumstances hold them back from pursuing their dreams,” Mullenneaux said. “I met her through Asheville High School social worker Pam Pauly.”

Mullenneaux attended Maharishi School and graduated Warren Wilson College before earning an MFA in Documentary Filmmaking at Wake Forest University.

Here’s a brief synopsis distilled from a description submitted by Condé Nast to the Television Academy: ‘Angelique’ is a short documentary following the life of a homeless high school girl who battles the odds to stay in school, get good grades, and go to college despite the challenges of living with a mother who suffers from bipolar disorder and an absentee father.

Artist Ananda Kesler is featured in The Hawk Eye: Abstract art as meditation in action, by Bob Saar

July 11, 2018

Last week I received an invitation from Ananda Kesler to the official opening of her art exhibit, “Longing for Another Realm,” at the Art Center of Burlington. I passed it on to my friend Bob Saar who writes for The Hawk Eye, and introduced them via email.

Intrigued, Bob went to the Art Center to interview Ananda as she was putting up her paintings for the show. They shared a deep conversation and he wrote an amazing piece for the newspaper. Titled “Abstract art as meditation in action,” it made the cover of the WEEKEND Section C1, Thursday, July 5, 2018. Bob was kind enough to put it together in a PDF for us to share. I know the print is small, but if you can expand your page (command and shift +), the text will become easier to read.

The opening sentence really captures the essence of Ananda and her work. It is the essential message, the seed containing the whole tree: “Ananda Kesler pursues her art in search of the one realm within which all things are connected.”

Bob discovers Ananda’s eclectic upbringing, starting in Israel and immigrating with her family to Fairfield, Iowa when she was 12 years old. She told him about her education. Ananda attended MSAE, started college at MUM, then switched to U of I where she graduated with a BFA. She continued her studies in art and textiles at various art schools in California, Thailand, and Italy. Her work has been featured in many shows and articles.

Bob mentions the meditating Fairfield community and MUM and writes, “Her unconventional education — rooted in eastern philosophy, spirituality and metaphysics — led her to search for the intersection of form, beauty, and the mysteries of the esoteric and unknown. Her abstract paintings have been described as invoking feelings that have yet to emerge as language.”

I like how Bob set up the topic of control in life and in painting, and how Ananda’s approach is the opposite. This idea illuminates her practice. Towards the end of the article she explains: “I practice painting as a kind of meditation in action,” from which he derived the title for the article.

She then describes what the process does for her: “I let the process of mark-making take me on a journey into the unknown.” This next part surprised me: “The marks teach me patience, teach me self-forgiveness; they are a constant reminder of how to abdicate control.”

Enjoy this brilliantly written and insightful article.

Ananda Kesler THE July 2018

KBUR also interviewed Ananda Kesler. See Dive into Another Realm.

Ananda’s description of her process, and the difference between feelings expressed in art, which are pre-verbal, and words, remind me of an experience I had during an intuitive art class I had taken years ago in Vancouver, Canada. See ArtWords—poem about a creative awakening.

A related topic, on the difference between words and art, is played out in the movie, Words and Pictures. The story, set in a New England prep school, was actually shot at St. George’s School, an independent boarding and day university-preparatory school for boys in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, a.k.a., Hollywood North. A poem, Who Are You?, is central to the film. I posted it, with the movie trailer, and a magical coincidence told by an English teacher from that school on a radio talk show I had heard while living there. See A poem in a movie inviting you to be who you are, to find out the connection, and what famous actor he meets while walking in the woods during a lunch break.

Beach Boys concert ‘fun, fun, fun’ for all

September 8, 2009

Beach Boys concert ‘fun, fun, fun’ for all

 

By BOB SAAR for The Hawk Eye

 

Published online: 9/8/2009

You might guess a band almost half a century old would be populated with superannuated blokes of yore.

Ah, but there are no old guys in the Beach Boys.

There were a lot of “old” baby boomer fans in the audience during Monday’s outdoor concert at Fairfield Middle School, but they were as uninhibited as any bunch of today’s teenagers ogling the Jonas Brothers.

The Beach Boys, centered around originals Mike Love and Bruce Johnston, included lead guitarist and music director Scott Totten, keyboardist Tim Bonhomme, Randell Kirsch on bass, guitarist Christian Love — son of Mike Love — and John Cowsill on drums.

You remember the Cowsills. Sure you do — that family band with the hit “Hair.”

Cowsill provided perfect surf drums for the two-hour concert, keeping many of the more than 4,000 concertgoers up and prancing the entire time. Those “old” folks did the Pony, the Swim, the Shimmy — long-forgotten go-go dances called up from collective memory by the jungle beat of surf music.

Kirsch, who has the daunting job of covering Beach Boy guru Brian Wilson’s high parts, relishes his spot.

“That’s the funnest job in the band,” he said.

Iowa band The Nadas provided the walk-in music with a solid set of roots rock.

“They were spot on awesome,” Iowa City musician Jason Bolinger said.

The main show began when Fairfield Mayor Ed Malloy lauded Love with a proclamation, introducing the 68-year-old singer as “Fairfield’s Energy Czar Emperor.” The concert was a benefit for the David Lynch Foundation and the Fairfield Arts and Convention Center, as well as a kickoff for Fairfield’s new Green Sustainability Plan aimed at energy conservation.

Love practices transcendental meditation at the Maharishi University of Management in Fairfield. MUM was founded by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi; the TM master was popular in the ’60s with the Beach Boys, the Beatles and other music and movie stars.

“Little Honda” got things up and running. At least a few aging Boomers recalled that the song is about motorcycles, not cars.

The vocals took a few songs to loosen up to the point of being totally tuned in and running smoothly, and that was OK — after all, the original band didn’t always hit all eight cylinders in concert.

And it was good and swell that this band didn’t do a clone routine, a “Mike Love Karaoke Hour.” They did all Beach Boy hits — my, those boys had a lot of hit singles — and they were the Beach Boys, without the Wilson boys, sure, but a real band, not some broken-down fossil staggering around the stage with the rights to a band name and a cadre of grungy sidemen to prop him up.

“Barbara Ann,” “Surfin’ Safari,” “California Girls,” “Surfer Girl,” “Sloop John B.” The concert list was seemingly endless.

“Wouldn’t it be nice” was quite nice: “We could be happy,” the band sang, and the crowd sang with them, extremely happy to be there on a storybook Indian summer day in Iowa.

Johnston’s lead vocals, especially on “Do You Wanna Dance?” were as clean and pure as any 25-year-old crooner touring today.

“Why Do Fools Fall In Love,” “Don’t Worry Baby,” “Good Vibrations,” God Only Knows.”

Children frolicked with their elders. Beach balls careened in the sky. Souls soared. People grew younger with each new tune.

A hotrod medley, of course: “Little Deuce Coupe,” “Shut Down,” “I Get Around” — one of surfdom’s best angsty laments — and “409.”

The old people knew the song referred to Chevy’s 409 cubic inch V8 engine coveted by hotrodders of the era. It is not known how many youngsters present wondered why this legendary group was singing about bathroom cleaning products.

The encore was not begged; everyone knew what was coming: “Fun, Fun, Fun.”

All had fun yesterday in Fairfield, all but the police, who had nothing more to do than direct traffic for the polite, smiling concertgoers.

“No fun for me today,” one Jefferson County deputy said. “I gotta work.”

Lynch Foundation Media Relations Director Ken Chawkin said the show was special for the band’s TM enthusiasts, especially Love.

“This must be a huge thrill for Mike, because he’s been coming here for years to meditate and take rejuvenation treatments,” Chawkin said of Love.

Perhaps that explains why there are no old guys in the Beach Boys.

Love was not too worn out afterward to echo the enthusiasm of the well-wishers who surrounded him backstage.

“I think it’s great here in Iowa,” he said. “This place is really special.”

The event producer for the David Lynch Foundation, Michael Sternfeld, was as upbeat as everyone else at the end of the show.

“There’s something about the audiences at Fairfield. … There’s something special here,” he said. “This was the ultimate experience. In terms of energy, we just nailed it.” He stopped to smile up into the blue. “We created serious good vibrations.”

Yeah, man. Good vibes and a whole lot of fun.

http://www.thehawkeye.com/story/beachboys-090809


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