Posts Tagged ‘solar panels’

MUM’s Innovative Sustainable Living Center @MaharishiU Featured in Solar Tribune

November 13, 2014

Small College Makes Solar a Big Priority

Nestled among the cornfields of Southeastern Iowa, Maharishi University of Management is not your typical small college. More than 40 years after its founding, this unique campus has become a showcase of sustainability and solar technology.

Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, best known as man who taught meditation to The Beatles, bought the defunct Parsons College campus in Fairfield, Iowa in 1971 and set up an accredited university to teach his philosophy of world peace and enlightenment through meditation. Along with computer science, accounting and BA, MA and PhD programs, the curriculum stresses healthy lifestyles and a healthy environment.

Biology Professor David Fisher launched the nation’s first four-year BA program in Sustainable Living at MUM in 2003. The Sustainable Living Department offers courses in solar, wind and other alternative energy systems, water management, permaculture, alternative building techniques, and performance design for the built environment, and their building serves as a hands-on showcase for the technologies they teach. On an annual basis, the building is not only a “net zero” building, but actually produces as much as 40% more energy than it consumes. The excess energy offsets electricity used elsewhere on campus.

South wall of MUM Sustainable Living Center

Opened in 2012, the Schwartz-Guich Sustainable Living Center at MUM is a showpiece of green building technology. The 6,900 square foot building features sustainable infrastructure including daylighting, a greenhouse and edible landscaping, gardens, rain catchment, earth block and “whole tree” construction and both solar thermal and solar photovoltaic (PV), as well as a wind turbine. The architectural style, known as “Vedic” architecture, marries eastern and western styles and reflects the philosophy of the university, while exceeding LEED platinum standards.

Daniel Chiras PhD is currently a visiting professor at the Sustainable Living Center. Dan serves as the Director of the Evergreen Institute and is author of over 30 books on solar and sustainability topics, including The Natural House, The Solar House, The Homeowner’s Guide to Renewable Energy and many more. Chiras said of the MUM building: “The Sustainable Living Center is one of the greenest—if not the greenest—classroom buildings on a college campus in the world! It’s an extraordinary model of ecological sustainability and an inspiration to those seeking to build a sustainable human future. The building is a pleasure to teach in and a great learning tool for students.”

Solar Features At The SLC:

The Sustainable Living Center sports 12.5 kW of PV panels to provide electricity. The PV panels are grid-tied by two 2.5 kW and one 5 kW SMA Sunny Boy inverters. An Outback 3.6 kW battery based inverter also stores energy in an off-grid battery bank. The solar PV at the Center puts out an average of 16,250 kWh per year.

A drain-back solar water heating system with 750 square feet of evacuated tube solar thermal collectors capture solar energy that is then stored in a 5,000 gallon tank, where it is then pumped through the in-floor heating system. The collectors provide about 30% of the heating for the building. Additional heat comes from a ground source heat pump, which uses electricity from the solar and wind systems to provide 75,000 BTUs per hour.

In addition to the solar arrays, The Sustainable Living Center features a Bergey XL 10 wind turbine on a 100 foot latticed tower. The estimated annual output is 17,000 kWh, with power production peaking in the winter and spring. This compliments the solar PV, which produces most of its power during the summer months, when wind speeds are typically much lower.

The SLC has an annual energy use of about 30,000 kWh, including lighting, heating and cooling, fresh air circulation office equipment and classrooms, which is already amazingly low for a building of its size.

Not only at the Sustainable Living Center, but across the entire MUM campus, sustainability initiatives are in full effect. In fact, the school achieved a perfect score for sustainable food sourcing and is the first college in the United States to offer an organic, 100% vegetarian menu. The college encourages bicycling and energy efficiency and is currently in the planning stages of a large-scale solar array to offset more of their electrical use with solar energy.

Read more about the MUM Sustainable Living Center at: https://www.mum.edu/academic-departments/sustainable-living/buildings/sl-bldg

Article reprinted with permission from the author. Solar Tribune is a solar news, education, and advocacy website. Article is published under: .

See more news about MUM’s SLC in this Des Moines Register article: Fairfield defines community action. There was a lot of news coverage on the official opening of MUM’s SLC, April 20, 2012. Here are two TV News reports, with links to other reports: KTVO News: Groundbreaking Sustainable Living Center a source of pride in Fairfield and WHO News: BEYOND GREEN: Building Produces Extra Energy. Also see The Fairfield Ledger: M.U.M.’s newest building sets new green standards.

The Fairfield Ledger: M.U.M.’s newest building sets new green standards

April 25, 2012

M.U.M.’s newest building sets new green standards

By DIANE VANCE, Ledger staff writer | Apr 23, 2012

It’s the ultimate green building, said Craig Pearson, executive vice president of Maharishi University of Management, at Friday’s grand opening of the Sustainable Living Center.

Pearson was quoting how The Associated Press described the newest building on campus while it was still under construction in an article that was published in national media, including Forbes, Business Week and MSNBC.

“This sets new standards,” said Pearson.

David Fisher, chairman of the Sustainable Living program, founded at M.U.M. in 2003, said plans for the building began in 2004.

“Its design evolved over time,” said Fisher. “The intention has been to be off the grid in all ways.

“Scores of environmental buildings are being built across the country, some much larger than this, but this is the only building to do it all in one building.”

Fisher said constructing the Sustainable Living Center was a teaching tool for builders, students and anyone who had a part in finishing the building.

“It’s a work in progress, a living building,” said Fisher.

Sustainability comes from materials used, the design and placement of windows for natural day lighting, rain catchment for water (not yet operational), solar panels and a wind turbine.

A classroom used for Friday’s grand opening news conference was furnished with about 21 wooden tables, constructed on campus.

“These tables are made from 19 different plant families all harvested within 100 miles of here,” said Fisher. “The differences in colors are natural, indicating the different woods.”

Faculty member Lonnie Gamble said designers and builders had to think outside the box on this building.

“This building and university are a great inspiration for the world,” he said.

Designer John Lippman has designed all the new buildings on campus since 2000. He listed the Sustainability Center as following architectural guidelines of Vastu, meeting gold LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification with plans to reach platinum, meeting the Living Building Challenge and meeting Building Biology standards.

“Vastu guidelines means the building is in harmony with nature,” said Lippman. “We have the silent core at the center of the building. High windows allow daylight to extend from two directions into the building’s rooms.

“We used natural materials in here, earth from the campus and whole tree trunks from Wisconsin.”

Sustainable Living student Makayla McDonald said the building reflects the people in the program.

“Community is strength,” she said. “This building has already drawn many people to come here. But it’s not just a building of classrooms. This is the merging of our dreams for the future. I want to express profound gratitude for this university and program. At age 20, it’s very important to have dreams and get to see them become reality.”

Fairfield Mayor and M.U.M. board of trustees member Ed Malloy, said the university was showing the kind of leadership in education that inspires everyone to consider new horizons with the grand opening of the Sustainable Living Center.

“In 2008, Fairfield began a process of creating a strategic plan for a sustainable community,” he said. “In 2009, we published the Fairfield Go Green plan and received national recognition.

“The theme that runs through the plan is to demonstrate for ourselves and others what a city can look like as it adopts new strategies and community designs. This building sets the highest standard.”

Malloy congratulated the university and everyone involved. He noted it was worthy to be called a learning center.

“Students participated in making the very materials that the walls are made of and participated as the mechanical systems that power the building were assembled,” said Malloy. “They will always know as they study in here that they are sheltered and powered by the very elements of nature that surround them — the earth, trees, wind and sun.

“Last year we celebrated gold LEED certification for Hy-Vee, and Kum & Go completed a renovation that earns them a silver LEED certification.”

The Sustainability Center building produces its own kilowatt energies and can send extra back to the grid to use to power other buildings on campus. With more fundraising, the building will complete the rainwater catchment system and waste treatment process, to move from gold to platinum certification.

URL: http://fairfield-ia.villagesoup.com/news/story/m-u-m-s-newest-building-sets-new-green-standards/814324

Photo by: DIANE VANCE/Ledger photo. Posted with permission from The Fairfield Ledger.

Also see: BEYOND GREEN: Building Produces Extra Energy | Maharishi University of Management to open new Sustainable Living Center, a net-zero energy bldg | Maharishi University dedicates efficient building | The Fairfield Ledger: Fairfield draws ‘who-da thunk it’ quote from Lode

Maharishi University dedicates efficient building

April 25, 2012

Sunday, April 22, 2012, 11:28 a.m.

Maharishi University dedicates efficient building

The Associated Press

FAIRFIELD, Iowa —

Dozens of solar panels and a 100-foot-tall wind turbine will help the Maharishi University of Management’s sustainable living center in Fairfield be among the state’s most efficient buildings.

University officials dedicated the building Friday, showing off a building that also makes use of technology such as a heat pump, geothermal tubing and careful placement of windows to maximize the use of daylight.

The Ottumwa Courier reports (http://bit.ly/Jp31nc) that Maharishi University Executive Vice President Craig Pearson expressed hope that the center would help other builders learn about sustainable options and build more environmentally friendly structures.

Lonnie Gamble, the professor and curriculum director for the sustainable living program, said the building will help him teach students about the possibilities of efficient buildings.

“Being in here means that instead of saying ‘here are the principles to build by’ — then apologizing for the building we’re in — I can show them what I’m talking about,” Gamble said.

When the solar panels and turbine produce more power than needed for the building, the energy will be sent to the campus grid and used for other buildings.

Fairfield Mayor Ed Malloy, who also is a Maharishi University board member, said students who learn about sustainable structures in the center will later create similar buildings throughout the world.

As more funding becomes available, the school intends to add a rain catchment system to provide water and will handle sewage in an on-site facility.

___

Information from: The Ottumwa Courier http://www.ottumwacourier.com

Copyright The Associated Press.

See: Newton Daily News: Maharishi University dedicates efficient building

BEYOND GREEN: Building Produces Extra Energy

April 18, 2012

NEWS: Renew Iowa

BEYOND GREEN: Building Produces Extra Energy

Posted on: 4:49 pm, April 18, 2012, by Megan Reutherupdated on: 06:46pm, April 18, 2012.

Students and staff at one University in Iowa have a new place to learn, and the building is as unique as the school. Students and staff at Maharishi University of Management in Fairfield are celebrating Earth Day this week by opening the school’s new Sustainable Living Center.

Designers say the multi-million project goes beyond green building. Sustainable Living Professor Lonnie Gamble says, “It does its own functions like a tree would. So, we use the metaphor of a tree for the design of the building.”

Gamble says the Sustainable Living Center is a living laboratory of classrooms, workshops and offices for the Sustainable Living Program. He says the building is like a tree because it collects and stores its own energy. The $2.5 million project includes a wind turbine and solar array and geothermal loop system. Architect Jon Lipman says, “The building produces more electricity than it uses.”

And, it doesn’t use much electricity. Lipman says the SLC is designed to strategically capture daylight, so lights aren’t needed anywhere in the building when the sun is shining. While showing the main hall, he says, “Up at the very top of it, we have windows, which are bringing south light down into the building, which then is being reflected down into the classrooms with these panels, and that allows us to get sunlight into the heart of the building.”

The students were also involved constructing the building made of local materials. Students made more than 25,000 compressed earth blocks. Gamble says, “The interior of the building is made from blocks of earth that are simply earth out of a parking lot we were building and put into a special machine that compressed it into blocks with no concrete or anything.”

As for the tree metaphor, trunks from the nearby state of Wisconsin actually serve a purpose by supporting the building’s roof. Lipman says round logs are more structurally sound than rectangular beams, so crews didn’t have to use as much of the resource found in nature. He says, “Which is a way of expressing in a very palpable way to the students that sustainable living, that discipline which teaches us how to live in harmony with nature, is really something that can be a part of the fabric of construction.”

You can see the Sustainable Living Center for yourself. The Maharishi University of Management is hosting a ribbon cutting this Friday in Fairfield. You can take a tour from 1 to 3:30 pm.

Click on URL to see the New at 5:00 report on Beyond Green Building: BEYOND GREEN: Building Produces Extra Energy http://whotv.com/2012/04/18/beyond-green-building-produces-energy/ (2:46).

Here are three permanent links to the report: a flash (.flv) file version (~22MB): http://www.rencapp.com/MUM_Schwartz-Guich-SLC.flv, an HD (720p .mp4) file (~32MB): MUM_Schwartz-Guich-SLC_x264.mp4, and an mpg file: http://www.rencapp.com/MUM_Schwartz-Guich-SLC_mpeg2.mpg. You can play whichever version might work best for you (the original and youtube uses flash).

Related: MSNBC: BEYOND GREEN: Building Produces Extra Energy | The Fairfield Ledger: Fairfield draws ‘who-da thunk it’ quote from Lode | Ottumwa Courier: Environmentally friendly building unveiled in Fairfield | The Hawk Eye: MUM to unveil sustainable center: Structure will be one of the only net-zero energy buildings in the nation | The Iowa Source: MUM’s Sustainable Living Center Opens April 20: Net Zero Building Will Produce More Energy Than It Consumes!Fairfield Ledger: M.U.M.’s newest building sets new green standards | WHIO TV (AP): Maharishi University dedicates efficient building | KTVO News: Groundbreaking Sustainable Living Center a source of pride in Fairfield | The Uncarved Blog: Maharishi University of Management to open new Sustainable Living Center, a net-zero energy bldg | AASHE Bulletin ArchivesMaharishi U Mgmt Debuts Net-Zero Sustainable Living Center + More | Iowa Association of Independent Colleges and Universities: New MUM Building a Net-Zero Energy Structure | Positive TV: MUM Sustainable Living Center to be “net-zero energy building” | The Iowan: Beyond LEED: Maharishi University’s Sustainable Living Center | MUM Blog: Now Open: MUM’s New Sustainable Living Center

Maharishi University of Management to open new Sustainable Living Center, a net-zero energy bldg

April 12, 2012
When Maharishi University of Management’s Sustainable Living Center opens April 20 it is expected to produce more energy than it will consume, thanks to a wind turbine, solar panels, geothermal tubing, extensive use of daylighting, earth block walls, verandas, and a range of other measures. (Photo by Tim Messenger)

MUM’s Sustainable Living Center To Be “Net-Zero Energy Building”

With an opening celebration and press conference scheduled for Friday, April 20, 11 am CT, Maharishi University of Management’s new Sustainable Living Center will have the distinction of being one of the few net-zero energy buildings in the country—it will produce as much if not more energy than it uses.

The building is designed to eventually be completely off the grid, including for water usage and waste treatment, as more funds are available. However, it will initially be connected to the grid, using electricity as needed during extreme weather conditions. At those times when the solar arrays and wind turbine produce more than the building uses, it will feed excess energy into the campus grid for use in other buildings.

Annually the building will produce more energy that it will consume.

The building’s 58 solar panels are capable of producing 15 kilowatts, and the 100-foot wind turbine is capable of producing 10 kilowatts. In addition, energy savings result from the use of technologies such as a heat pump and geothermal tubing. Many passive methods of alternative energy also contribute, such as extensive use of daylighting, the use of earth block walls to moderate temperature extremes and insulate, and strategic placement of windows and verandas.

A view of Maharishi University of Management‘s new Sustainable Living Center taken from the 100-foot wind turbine tower by MUM alum and installer Troy Van Beek of Ideal Energy. Energy cottage is to the right, Golden Domes are in the distance. (Photo by Troy Van Beek)

As more funds are raised, more features will be added until the Sustainable Living Center is completely off the grid with respect to electricity, heating, cooling, water, and waste. A rain catchment system will provide water, and there will be on-site sewage treatment.

“Even in this phase of development, the building is one of the best of the current generation of green buildings,” Mr. Gamble said. Eventually the building will be carbon neutral, which entails being completely off the grid.

“Our carbon footprint is much smaller than most new buildings as we used earth block, earth plasters, and many other low-embodied energy and low-carbon materials in construction,” Mr. Gamble said.

In addition to many University supporters, Kresge Foundation and Wege Foundation provided grants, and nationally recognized leaders in green building materials offered in-kind donations.

The building currently qualifies for gold LEED certification, said construction manager Tim Messenger. But the application is being held until the water and waste systems are in place, which will raise the Sustainable Living Center to the highest level of LEED certification, that of platinum.

The opening of the Sustainable Living Center will coincide with the EcoFairfield weekend being organized by students, and also with Earth Day on April 22.

EcoFairfield events will begin Friday afternoon with community service tree planting, and a keynote presentation by Seth Braun on Friday evening on shaping a collective vision for the future of Fairfield. See ecofairfield.wordpress.com.

To find out more about Fairfield and neighboring Maharishi Vedic City, visit http://discoverfairfield.org.

Schedule of Events:

WEDNESDAY EVENING, 7:00 p.m.
Traditional ceremony to open the Sustainable Living Center.

FRIDAY MORNING, 11:00 a.m.
Grand opening, with press conference.

FRIDAY AFTERNOON, 1:00-4:00 p.m.
Open house and tours of the Sustainable Living Center

SATURDAY AFTERNOON, 12:30 p.m. and 2:00 p.m.
Tours of the Sustainable Living Center

See B.S. in Sustainable Living at Maharishi University of Management: News: Sustainable Living Center Grand Opening

Related articles: WHO TV: BEYOND GREEN: Building Produces Extra EnergyKTVO News: Groundbreaking Sustainable Living Center a source of pride in Fairfield | MSNBC: BEYOND GREEN: Building Produces Extra Energy | The Fairfield Ledger: Fairfield draws ‘who-da thunk it’ quote from Lode | Ottumwa Courier: Environmentally friendly building unveiled in Fairfield | The Hawk Eye: MUM to unveil sustainable center: Structure will be one of the only net-zero energy buildings in the nation | The Iowa Source: MUM’s Sustainable Living Center Opens April 20: Net Zero Building Will Produce More Energy Than It Consumes! | AASHE Bulletin ArchivesMaharishi U Mgmt Debuts Net-Zero Sustainable Living Center + More | Iowa Association of Independent Colleges and Universities: New MUM Building a Net-Zero Energy Structure | Positive TV: MUM Sustainable Living Center to be “net-zero energy building” | The Iowan: Beyond LEED: Maharishi University’s Sustainable Living Center | The Iowan: Sizing Up Small Towns: Rethinking Success in Rural Iowa: Fairfield Thinks Inclusively | BUILDINGS Magazine: A Zero Utility Bill Building | The Iowa Source: MUM Sustainable Living Center

Documentary shines a new light on rural energy

February 24, 2011

‘Sustain Angoon’ documentary shines a new light on rural energy

By Richard Radford | Capital City Weekly
Wednesday, February 23, 2011

“December and the Meter’s Spinning Backwards,” Southeast Alaska Conservation Council Energy Coordinator Dan Lesh wrote on the Sustain Angoon blog. He included photographs of the frozen landscape surrounding the demonstration house – the home of Angoon elders Peggy and Kelly Williams – and a video that indeed showed the electric meter rotating counterclockwise.

This is no small feat for a community which has energy costs that can add up to as high as $1,200 a household a month, about 6 to 8 times more expensive than in the Lower 48. Angoon is heavily dependent on non-renewable resources, and combined with a shrinking population and high unemployment, keeping up with the bills can prove to be a challenge.

What sent the wheel of progress spinning forward and the meter backwards? The Sustain Angoon Project, which tackled the problem of energy usage from several angles, involving a combination of weatherization, energy efficiency and renewable energy systems. The efforts of the project have culminated in a film, which will be shown this week at a special screening in Juneau.

The project has combined the collective efforts of several organizations including the Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska, SEACC, the Tlingit-Haida Regional Housing Authority (THRHA), Angoon Business Center, and the Maharishi University of Management of Iowa.

The Williams’ house was fitted out with new insulation and siding, caulking and sealing and duct repair. Improved high-efficiency lighting and Energy Star appliances were installed, monitored by The Energy Detective, or TED 5000, system. Solar panels were put up, including a solar hot water system.

Solar power is not the first thing one might think of when talking about energy in Southeast Alaska, but Lesh said that the system appears to be operational and effective.

“When you’re talking about a place that pays five times as much for energy, it doesn’t matter if you get one sixth of the sun,” he said.

The meter actually does run backwards on sunny days, Lesh said, though of course in the winter there are few hours of daylight, so at least during this time of year the new equipment doesn’t cancel out all energy usage.

There have been a few issues working out all the details of monitoring the solar hot water system, though there is anecdotal evidence from the Williams family who noticed that their boiler doesn’t kick on during sunny days.

They also put up a wind tower and hooked it up to the local school, which charges batteries that can run the washing machines. They have yet to set up a monitoring system for that, but so far it seems to be working.

Lesh said that the problem of high energy bills can’t be solved by just turning the lights out before leaving a room. On average citizens in places like Angoon, served by the Inside Passage Electrical Cooperative, use far less energy than residents of places like Juneau.

“So they turn the lights off, they use everything sparingly, but they may have something that’s on that’s draining power or leaky windows,” he said. “But they are head and shoulders above us [who live in cities] in terms of a lot of types of behavior in terms of energy efficiency.”

Renewable energy systems and weatherization are expensive, and Lesh said it will take time to work out how cost effective their implementations are.

“Not to say that our project should be replicated, but the kinds of discussions we’ve been generating should lead to more action along those lines,” he said. “Energy efficiency is low-hanging fruit that would make big differences in the villages.”

Newer to the project is Carrie Sykes, who started her position as the Business & Economic Development manager at Central Council in October. Sykes said she has worked with the THRHA on a joint application to expand similar ideas being explored in Angoon for other communities in Southeast with high energy costs like Kake and Hoonah.

Another project on the drawing board is a training program for local people in weatherization, which could help cut energy costs and provide jobs.

“When you put in this kind of stuff, you’ll need people who will be familiar in case something goes wrong,” she said.

Teaching and learning are the most important things to take away from the project as it progresses, Sykes said. The documentary will hopefully be a good tool to spark interest, especially with the younger generation.

“You really have to start educating, and start educating young,” she said. “We’re going to be getting the documentary to the schools, science teachers and all the tribes. We want to get it out there about all that can be done.”

Robert Gongwer, co-founder of the Iowa-based socially and environmentally conscious consulting firm Tidal Wave Group, said that there some in Angoon who doubted that the project would get pulled off, who were later “blown away when the electric meter started running backwards.”

“It was a big turning point, when it became real,” he said.

Gongwer co-directed the documentary, working on pre-production in Angoon in September of last year when the project was building up steam, and has recently put the final polish on the film. Coming from the outside, he was nervous about being able to give the best description of what was going on in Angoon. The goal was to be totally honest about the people, the community, and the energy providers.

He and his team wanted to make sure that the community was receptive to the project before getting involved. He was taken aback by the amount of hospitality shown to them by the residents of Angoon, regardless of any reservations they had about the potential of the project.

“We went to the [ANB Hall], and everyone was just so, so happy,” he said.

There is a respect for older people in Angoon, Gongwer said, and they are not only cared for, they are looked to for answers.

“It just really struck me as something that is really broken in the culture I’m from,” he said.

The concerns voiced by the elders of Angoon were first and foremost on Gongwer’s mind while working on the project.

“[An elder] told us her worst fear is to fly over Angoon with her grandchildren and tell them, ‘that’s where we used to live,'” he said.

The Sustain Angoon Project has shown the kinds of things that can be accomplished, Gongwer said, though there is still a lot more exploration to be done. The project isn’t the solution, but rather a demonstration of one take on a larger set of solutions. Maharishi University of Management Professor Lonnie Gamble, who also worked on the project, explained the situation as, “We don’t need a silver bullet, we need silver buckshot.”

“We’ve made some progress, that’s great,” Gongwer said, “but really the issue is how can we sustain progress? We just need to keep after it…maybe this [project] will help to change some laws, change some policies.”

“Sustain Angoon” will be shown at the Silverbow (120 Second Street) back room Thursday, Feb. 24 at 5:30 p.m. There will also be a discussion with members of the project. For more information or to follow new developments of the project, go online at www.sustainangoon.org.

Richard Radford may be reached at richard.radford@capweek.com

There are additional photos for viewing at the top right of the article. Go to: Click Thumbnails to View. Click on a photo, then click on it again for a larger view.  Here are the descriptions to go with some of those photos: Work on the house got underway in early fall of 2010. During sunny days, the electric meter actually runs backwards now. The community of Angoon came together to work on the energy project. The Williams’ house was fitted out with new insulation and siding, caulking and sealing and duct repair. Improved high-efficiency lighting and Energy Star appliances were installed, monitored by The Energy Detective, or TED 5000, system. Solar panels were put up, including a solar hot water system.

This article was also published in The Washington Examiner
Film looks at energy-saving efforts in Angoon

In this September 2010 photo provided by Tlingit and Haida Central Council, workers with the Sustain Angoon Project talk in the southeast Alaska village of Angoon. The Sustain Angoon Project tackled the problem of energy usage in the village from several angles, involving a combination of weatherization, energy efficiency and renewable energy systems. The efforts of the project have culminated in a film.


<span>%d</span> bloggers like this: