Posts Tagged ‘wisdom’

Selected Wise Words From Rumi

February 28, 2015

There are many wise sayings from Rumi. Some were posted on the blog: something to tell. I copied a few thoughtful and instructive ones:

Raise your words, not voice. It is rain that grows flowers, not thunder.

When someone is counting out gold for you, don’t look at your hands, or the gold. Look at the giver.

Let yourself be silently drawn by the strange pull of what you really love. It will not lead you astray.

You are not just the drop in the ocean. You are the mighty ocean in the drop.

Yesterday I was clever, so I wanted to change the world. Today I am wise, so I am changing myself.

See more quotes and images from this blogger at rumi’s wise words.

You may also enjoy Two kinds of knowledge about living and learning.

Here’s another one: Poems by Rumi and Octavio Paz open our minds to a more cosmic perspective. Also see several inspiring poems by Hafiz.

 

Two kinds of knowledge about living and learning

April 8, 2014

I’m not young enough to know everything. ― Oscar Wilde (1854–1900)

By the time you’re eighty years old you’ve learned everything.
You only have to remember it. ― George Burns (1896–1996)

Two kinds of knowledge

There are two kinds of knowledge:
Youth knows it all, without having lived;
And having lived and learned, Old Age
Soon forgets what it’s come to know.

Then there’s the wisdom
Of knowing you know nothing;
But knowing your Self.

― Ken Chawkin (1944–still learning)

The Coming Of Wisdom With Time

Though leaves are many, the root is one;
Through all the lying days of my youth
I swayed my leaves and flowers in the sun;
Now I may wither into the truth.

― William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)

The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing.
Socrates (469–399 B.C.E.)

Know thyself.
Ancient Greek aphorism on the Temple of Apollo at Delphi

Those who know are wise. Those who know themselves are enlightened.
― Laozi (5th or 4th century BC)

Yesterday I was clever, so I wanted to change the world. Today I am wise, so I am changing myself.
Rumi (13th century Persian poet and Sufi mystic.)

Also see: Searching For The Meaning Of Your Life.

And this related poem: Seeing Is Being.

Journeying god—traditional Ghanaian prayer song

March 10, 2013
journeying god
I found this beautiful traditional prayer song from Ghana, and photo, posted in the Panhala Archive. The translator is unknown.

Journeying god,
pitch your tent with mine
so that I may not become deterred
by hardship, strangeness, doubt.
Show me the movement I must make
toward a wealth not dependent on possessions,
toward a wisdom not based on books,
toward a strength not bolstered by might,
toward a god not confined to heaven.
Help me to find myself as I walk in other’s shoes.

Yunus Emre says Wisdom comes from Knowing Oneself — a Singularity that contains the Whole

April 1, 2012

I tried to make sense of the Four Books*,
until love arrived,
and it all became a single syllable.

(*Torah, Psalms, Gospel, Quran, considered by Islamic tradition to be four Divinely revealed books.)

From #21, page 43, chapter II, The Way of Love, in The Drop That Became The Sea, Lyric Poems of Yunus Emre. Translated from the Turkish by Kabir Helminski and Refik Algan.

This theme of the single syllable, the first letter of the alphabet, containing everything, is reiterated in this poem #26, page 52, chapter III, Necessary Lessons, where wisdom is equated with Self-knowledge.

Wisdom comes from knowing wisdom.
Wisdom means knowing oneself.

If you do not know yourself,
what is the point of reading books?

The point of reading is to know something real.
Since you have read and do not know it,
reading is useless.

Don’t say, “I’ve read, I’ve learned.”
Don’t say, “I’ve worshipped a lot.”

If you don’t accept the Perfect Man,
all other works are futile.

The meaning of the Four Books is clear and complete.
It shows itself in the first letter, aleph.

If you don’t know what aleph is,
what do you know of reading?

You recite every syllable of the alphabet.
You say “Aleph,” but how little it means.

Yunus Emre says:
“Hey Hoja, you’ve made a thousand pilgrimages
but never been welcomed by a single heart.”

(more…)

Timeless Journey (Traveling with Maharishi)

October 2, 2009

This is the seat of the Shankaracharya of Jyothir Math high in the Himalayas in India, where Maharishi studied with his teacher, Guru Dev, from 1940 to 1953. Sali Peden was fortunate to have traveled back to Uttar Kashi with Maharishi and a small group of people. Here is her memory of that special time in a poem.


Timeless Journey

We reached the hill station,
worn from dusty heat and endless mountain curves,
just as dusk descended.

Far in the hills below,
the river,
where Shankara once bathed,
traced a thin course through the valley.

The ashram,
quiet, still
etched against the hills
in the fading light—
looked ancient, removed from time.

Here, eternal wisdom passed
from generation to generation,
pure, untouched by history’s course.

We moved in the breath of the greatest ones,
their presence, lively still.
Brilliant solemnity,
our ancient longings fulfilled.

—Sally “Sali” Peden


(Also see: Pilgrimage and To Jyotir Math by Sally Peden)


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