Halt Nepal’s Political Unrest Now With Vedic Defence

Global Politician

Halt Nepal’s Political Unrest Now With Vedic Defence
By Dr. Kingsley Brooks and Dr. David Leffler

Nepal, the land of Himalayas and Veda, is today facing a great challenge of ever increasing internal violence by various groups of insurgents. How does it stop the political unrest that cripples Nepal’s economy and causes other social problems that could lead to more war and terrorism? Achieving economic success while happily living in perpetual peace is not only an intrinsic desire but also a fervent wish of the citizens of Nepal.

Despite advanced technology and the boldness, courage, strength, and intelligence of Nepal’s armed forces, the nation still struggles to eliminate violent extremism and to achieve a lasting peace. Violent extremism is a human problem requiring human solutions. The underlying cause of extremist social violence is accumulated social stress. Therefore, to eliminate such social problems, the military needs to reduce the collective societal stress in Nepal.

Is there a way to reduce collective stress and create peace? If so, how could such an ideal goal be achieved in Nepal where tensions are so high? During these dangerous times, Nepal must rely on a scientifically verified approach to quickly reduce the tensions which are fueling violent extremism. Extensive scientific research indicates that the best way to reduce collective societal stress, eliminate extremism, boost the economy and thereby snuff out war and terrorism is to adopt an ancient Vedic strategy. In modern times this strategy is called Invincible Defence Technology (IDT) and was revived by the late Maharishi Mahesh Yogi in a non-religious manner. It has been quietly and successfully used by members of many faiths worldwide to eliminate conflict in the past.

A Prevention Wing of the Military consisting of 3% of the armed forces of Nepal could achieve this goal. This special unit would be trained in Invincible Defence Technology and would collectively practice its ancient Vedic technologies of consciousness – the Transcendental Meditation (TM) and TM-Sidhi programs – in large groups, twice a day.

Extensive research shows that the size of the group needed to reduce social stress in a given population should exceed the square root of 1% of the population size. To calculate this number, multiply the population size by 0.01, and then take the square root of the result. For instance, the population of Nepal is approximately 27 million: 27,000,000 x 0.01 = 270,000, and the square root of 270,000 is approximately 520, so a group of at least 520 IDT experts is needed. (Source: http://www.SquareRootofOnePercent.org)

Studies show that when these thresholds are exceeded, crime goes down, quality of life indices go up, and war and terrorism abate. Scientists named this phenomenon “The Maharishi Effect” in honor of Maharishi, who first predicted it. For instance, a Maharishi Effect intervention was implemented and studied in the US capital of Washington, DC, in 1993. Predictions were lodged in advance with government leaders and newspapers. An independent Project Review Board approved the research protocol. Crime fell 24 percent below expected levels when the group size reached its maximum. Weekend effects, temperature, and previous trends in the data failed to account for changes. These findings were published in Social Indicators Research (1999, vol. 47, 153–201).

Over 50 studies have shown that IDT works. The causal mechanism has been postulated to be a field effect of consciousness—a spillover effect on the level of the unified field from the peace-creating group into the larger population. On this basis, a study in the Journal of Social Behavior and Personality (2005, vol. 17, #1, pp. 339–373) additionally offers a proposed explanation of causality of IDT in biological terms. Research conducted on the powerful neurotransmitter serotonin shows that it produces feelings of contentment, happiness and even euphoria. Low levels of serotonin, according to research, correlate with violence, aggression, and poor emotional moods. The IDT study showed that higher numbers of IDT experts correlated with a marked increase in serotonin production among other community members. These results were statistically significant and followed the attendance figures in the IDT group. This finding offers a plausible neurophysiologic mechanism to explain reduced hostility and aggression in society at large.

IDT has also been documented worldwide in a study published in the Journal of Offender Rehabilitation (2003, vol. 36, #1–4, 283–302) using data provided by the Rand Corporation. When large assemblies of IDT experts exceeded the Maharishi Effect threshold for the world during the years 1983–1985, deaths due to terrorism globally decreased 72%, international conflict decreased 32%, and violence was reduced in nations throughout the world without intrusion by other governments.

The armed forces of Nepal are responsible for protecting the nation’s citizens, and are obligated to thoroughly examine realistic, scientifically validated methods for ending war and terrorism. Nepal’s foreign policy and defence policy are largely committed to creating a peaceful world. Therefore, it would be consistent for Nepal to adopt a non-lethal defence system.

Since joining the United Nations in 1955, Nepal has expressed abiding faith in the principles and purposes enshrined in the UN Charter regarding goals of international peace, security, and promoting international cooperation for economic and social development. The Nepal military can play a leading role with its readymade manpower for crisis management with a mostly effortless modification of its ongoing training programs.

Ultimately, it is the duty of the armed forces of Nepal to quickly establish a Prevention Wing of the Military in order to create economic success, peace and stability in Nepal today.

Dr. Kingsley Brooks is Senior International Administrator for Nepal for the Global Country of World Peace, established to unify all nations in prosperity and invincibility. Formerly he was Administrative Director for the Institute of Science, Technology and Public Policy. Dr. David Leffler, a United States Air Force veteran, is the Executive Director of the Center for Advanced Military Science (CAMS) at the Institute of Science, Technology and Public Policy.

© 2004-2008 Global Politician

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