Being in Nature—a gift from a tree

We often hear about the the benefits of being in nature. I remembered an experience I had with a tree when I went for a winter walk with a friend on the University Endowment Lands in Vancouver during the mid-1990s.

I stopped in front of a particular tree to admire its intricate bark structure up close. I felt a ray of loving attention come from the tree into my heart-mind with these words: “the realness of natural things, the nearness of you.” It was an unexpected intimate experience and I quickly wrote the words down for further exploration. The next morning, I rewrote them as a two-line stanza, and then sequential stanzas naturally unfolded sharing its wisdom. It was as if I had been given a creative seed and it sprouted into a poem.

This gift from the tree was much appreciated. The experience reiterated what Mary Oliver described in her poem, Praying. It was a “doorway into thanks, and a silence in which another voice may speak.” It also reminded me of what Mary Oliver told Krista Tippett in an interview, that attention is the beginning of devotion.

I later titled the poem Being in Nature, implying a double meaning for the word, being, from both sides of the experience. Its sequel, trees, was about the nature of trees, and what we can learn from them.

Being in Nature
a gift from a tree

The Realness of Natural Things
The nearness of you

The Beauty that Nature Brings
When seeing is true

The Silence that Inward Sings
When hearing is clear

The Harmony Between all Beings
It exists right here!

© Ken Chawkin

More poems about trees

See trees—a poem about the nature of trees, a sequel to Being in Nature—a gift from a tree. Both written mid-1990′s during winter in Vancouver, BC. What Do Trees Do? Something to think about was written when I was living in North Vancouver.

Pine Cone Trees was written earlier while staying in Houston, Texas.

Willow Tree – a tanka – from a tree’s perspective followed by Friendship – another tree tanka were written much later after I had returned again to Fairfield, Iowa.

See Mary Oliver’s poem, Praying, is a lesson on attention, receptivity, listening and writing.

An early encounter with nature inspired my creativity. It turned into my first published poem, which won an award: ODE TO THE ARTIST, Sketching Lotus Pads at Round Prairie Park.

UPDATE: Reading “Being in Nature” on Let Your Heart Sing

I read ‘Being in Nature: A Gift from a Tree’ on ‘Let Your Heart Sing’ radio show #93: “John Stein’s Interview + Environmental Songs.” The poem completed that show, which first aired during the last week of May 2019.

Sheila Moschen created and hosted a series of 108 shows for KHOE World Radio, 90.5 FM, which air Wednesdays at 1 & 7 PM. The station broadcasts and streams from the campus of Maharishi International University in Fairfield, Iowa.

Sheila said 90 of her “Let Your Heart Sing” shows are on YouTube, and 68 of them include photos of the singers. You can hear me read my poem, with visuals, starting at 30:53.

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9 Responses to “Being in Nature—a gift from a tree”

  1. trees—a poem about the nature of trees « The Uncarved Blog Says:

    […] sequel to Being in Nature, a gift from a tree. Both written mid-1990′s in winter, Vancouver, […]

    Like

  2. Vancouver Park Poems by Ken Chawkin « The Uncarved Blog Says:

    […] two poems, Being in Nature, and its sequel, trees—a poem about the nature of trees, were a gift from a tree on the edge of […]

    Like

  3. Mary Oliver’s poem, Praying, is a lesson on attention, receptivity, listening and writing | The Uncarved Blog Says:

    […] a creative seed and it sprouted. This gift from the tree was much appreciated. I later called it Being in Nature. Its sequel, trees, was about the nature of trees, and what we can learn from them. Another poem […]

    Like

  4. Redwood Forest Haiku, two versions, inspired by a photo my sister took in a Redwood Forest Park | The Uncarved Blog Says:

    […] Being in Nature, a gift from a tree, with links to other tree […]

    Like

  5. The Enlightened Heart, a poem by Ken Chawkin | The Uncarved Blog Says:

    […] Below and a complementary poem, Pine Cone Trees, written several years later. A later nature poem, Being in Nature, was written in Vancouver, Canada. You can see more of My poems on The Uncarved […]

    Like

  6. Poets Kenneth Rexroth and William Wordsworth Experienced Transcendence and Self-Awareness | The Uncarved Blog Says:

    […] poems I wrote, Seeing Is Being, and Being In Nature, share a similar sentiment, but not quite as eloquently as these masters! Two earlier published […]

    Like

  7. A profound poem from Karen Karns asks us — WHAT COULD BE MORE INTIMATE? | The Uncarved Blog Says:

    […] While living in Vancouver, BC, I received a gift from a tree that later unfolded into Being in Nature. […]

    Like

  8. David Whyte describes the mysterious way a poem starts inside you with the lightest touch | The Uncarved Blog Says:

    […] he was in school, INSPIRATION, a poem by Nathanael Chawkin. I would receive my inspiration while Being in Nature. With reference to “the silence that follows a great line,” Billy Collins discusses the […]

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  9. Ken Chawkin Says:

    Reblogged this on The Uncarved Blog and commented:

    We often hear about the the benefits of being in nature. I remembered an experience I had with a tree when I went for a winter walk with a friend on the University Endowment Lands in Vancouver during the mid-1990s. I’ve now updated that blog post with what had happened and how a poem came to be written around 25 years ago. The post contains links to other poems written about trees, and advice from Mary Oliver.

    Like

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