Emily Dickinson’s Solitude is Vedic Nivartatwam

Emily Dickinson beautifully, concisely describes the transcendental self-referral value of true inner solitude by realizing her unbounded Self.

There is a solitude of space
A solitude of sea
A solitude of death, these
Society shall be
Compared with that profounder site
That polar privacy
A soul admitted to itself —
Finite infinity.

When Emily admits the self to the Self, she reiterates the Vedic injunction to transcend, retire, Nivartatwam, into that infinitely silent, Shivam, infinitely peaceful, Shantam, undivided, Advaitam, fourth, Chaturtham, state of consciousness, Atma, the Self.

Emily Dickinson succinctly describes the eternal nature of Love in this short but powerful poem.

Derek Walcott had his own way of describing this return to love, to one’s Self, in Love after Love.

Read how Emily Dickinson wanted her poems to look on the page, described in Rebecca Mead’s Back of the Envelope in The New Yorker: Poesy Dept. | January 27, 2014 Issue.

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4 Responses to “Emily Dickinson’s Solitude is Vedic Nivartatwam”

  1. cb108 Says:

    My favorite Emily poem. And “polar privacy” clearly refers to “Atma” which, as Maharishi Mahesh Yogi says, is the “flow from infinity to point value, from point to infinity, infinity to point.” (from the “pole of infinity” to the other pole, its point). Emily was certainly a “Transcendentalist”.

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  2. Emily Dickinson succinctly describes the eternal nature of Love in this short but powerful poem | The Uncarved Blog Says:

    […] another Vedic perspective from America’s greatest poet, see Emily Dickinson’s Solitude, where she describes the self-referral process of the self integrating with the Self, finite […]

    Like

  3. For Emily Dickinson the brain is wider than the sky and deeper than the sea — a finite infinity | The Uncarved Blog Says:

    […] See Emily Dickinson’s Solitude is Vedic Nivartatwam and Emily Dickinson succinctly describes the eternal nature of Love in this short but powerful poem. […]

    Like

  4. A Blessing of Solitude by John O’Donohue complements Derek Walcott’s Love after Love | The Uncarved Blog Says:

    […] See Emily Dickinson’s Solitude. […]

    Like

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